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The Illinois Campaign for Political Reform is a 501(c)3 non-partisan public interest group that conducts research and advocates reforms to promote public participation in government, address the role of money in politics and encourage integrity, accountability, and transparency in government.

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  • Campaign finance reform

Illinois AG Candidates Consider the Office “Front Line” Against President Trump

Sexual Harassment Claims Shed Light on Transparency, Accountability, and Oversight Gaps in the General Assembly

Illinois Continues to Lead Nationally in Fundraising for Governors’ Races

Illinois Lobbying: High in Numbers, Lacking in Disclosure

Ensuring Secure and Accessible Elections for Illinois in 2018

Pritzker Continues Spending Blitz in Governor’s Race, AG Race Heats Up

The Illinois Voter Project

Campaign finance reform

The Illinois Sunshine database is a free resource for tracking campaign contributions and expenditures in Illinois. Click here to view.

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Sex-Harassment Bill Puts Illinois Leaders on the Defensive

Board Chair Susan Garrett was mentioned in this article. House Speaker Michael Madigan s legislation requiring sexual-harassment awareness training for virtually everyone working in the Capitol appeared proactive, an effort to get out in front of a roiling national issue that

Expensive Illinois Governor Race Spills Down The Ballot | State-and-Regional

Executive Director Sarah Brune was quoted in this article. Via- Poltical News By now, it’s already evident the 2018 race for Illinois governor is a contest like no other. The amount of money raised so far has already blown past

Editorial: Illinois Legislators Need Sexual Harassment Training

ICPR was mentioned in this article. Via Daily Herald Rumors have abounded for years that the atmosphere around the state Capitol in Springfield is one of, shall we say, excess. From that standpoint, it was not all that surprising

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Campaign, TheHill, campaign finance reform.#Campaign #finance #reform


TheHill

  • Campaign finance reform

National poll: Majority says Moore should drop out

A majority of voters across the country believe Alabama Republican Senate nominee Roy Moore should drop out of the race due to the sexual misconduct accusations levied against him, according to a new Morning Consult/Politico survey.

  • Campaign finance reform

    Dem Jones avoids Moore attacks as allegations mount

    The bombshell sexual misconduct allegations against Alabama GOP nominee Roy Moore have roiled the state’s Senate race, giving Democrats an unusual chance to win a seat in the deep-red state.

  • Campaign finance reform

    Report: Adelson splits with Bannon over 2018 efforts

    GOP megadonor and Las Vegas casino owner Sheldon Adelson is reportedly breaking with ex-Trumpp adviser Stephen Bannon and switching his support to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) over Bannon’s push to challenge Republican incumbents.

    1. Campaign finance reform

    Republican senators wrestle with their Roy Moore problem

    Senate Republicans are stepping up pressure on Roy Moore to withdraw from the Alabama Senate race after new sexual misconduct allegations on Monday, but many stopped well short of pledging to expel him if he wins the special election next month. .

  • Campaign finance reform

    GOP mobilizes against Moore

    Senate Republicans on Monday signaled that they will do whatever it takes to prevent Roy Moore from becoming the next senator from Alabama, though hopefully without letting the seat fall into Democratic hands.Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.).

  • Campaign finance reform

    Alabama rep: I m still backing Moore because he ll vote right

    Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.) said Monday that he will still back GOP candidate Roy Moore, who is facing mounting allegations of sexual misconduct, in the Alabama Senate special election because Moore will “vote right” on Capitol Hill.“There are major.


  • SOS: Campaign Finance, campaign finance.#Campaign #finance


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    • Indiana Campaign Finance Online
    • 2018 Campaign Finance Manual
    • 2018-2019 Campaign Finance Reporting Schedule
    • 2015 Candidate Campaign Finance School
    • Political Signs and Disclaimers Brochure
    • Indiana Election Commission Campaign Finance Advisory Opinions
    • 2016 Election Calendar (Administrator’s Edition)
    • Campaign Finance Software Vendors
    • Electronic Campaign Finance Reporting SpecificationsRevised January 2012
      • EDI_Excel_97-2003_Template_v_1_0.xls
      • EDI_Excel_Template.xls_v0_0_1.xls
      • EDI_SampleExcel_v20101115.xslx
      • IN EDI_XMLSchema
      • IN_EDI_SampleXML_v20101115.xml
      • Indiana SPREADSHEETEDI Specification.docx
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    • Candidate’s Statement of Organization (CFA-1)
    • PAC and Caucus Committee’s Statement of Organization (CFA-2)
    • Regular Party Committee Statement of Organization (CFA-3)
    • Report of Receipts and Expenditures of a Political Committee (CFA-4)
    • Report of Receipts and Expenditures of a Political Committee (CFA-4)
    • Notice of Contribution or Expenditure To Candidate’s Committee (CFA-5)
    • Supplemental Large Contribution Report by a Candidate’s Committee (CFA-11)

    OCPF – Welcome to the OCPF Home Page, campaign finance.#Campaign #finance


    campaign finance

    All filers registered with OCPF can file their periodic campaign finance reports and late contribution reports online using Reporter 6. File Online

    Ballot Question Spending CPF22 or 22A Reports

    CPF 22 ballot question spending reports are filed by individuals, for-profit business corporations, associations and organizations. CPF 22A reports are filed by the treasurers of cities, towns, or other governmental units.

    Electioneering Communications

    Individuals, groups and organizations can file their reports of electioneering activity online.

    Independent Expenditures CPF 18A Reports

    Reports of independent expenditure activity can be filed online. To begin, select your filer type:

    IEPAC reports include contributor information.

    Report Log

    View a listing of the most recently filed reports, in descending order by filing date.

    IE PAC Independent Expenditures

    View independent expenditure reports filed by IE PACs. The reports are grouped by year and can be filtered by filer, candidate, or date.

    Electioneering Communications

    View reports of electioneering communications filed by individuals, groups and associations. The reports are grouped by year and can be filtered by filer, candidate or date.

    Independent Expenditures

    View reports of independent expenditures filed by individuals, groups, associations, corporations, labor unions, political committees or other entities. The reports are grouped by year and can be filtered by filer, candidate or date.

    Special Elections

    View the reports filed by candidates in special elections, grouped by seat.

    Legislative Races

    View reports filed by legislative candidates, grouped by seat, from 2002 to the present.

    PACs and People’s Committees

    View report filed by political action committees, grouped by year from 2002 to the present.

    Ballot Questions

    View ballot question committee reports, grouped by ballot question.

    Donations Segregated Funds

    View reports filed by candidates with recount, legal defense or inaugural fund accounts.

    Campaign finance

    Charts & Graphs

    Legislative race and ballot question spending charts.

    Search Contributions and Expenditures

    Search all itemized contributions and expenditures for all registered filers.

    Download Data

    Download our entire electronic report database, account type listings, filer listings or district code listings.

    Filer Reports

    Browse filer reports and data.

    Registered Filers

    Browse a listing of all candidates and committees registered with OCPF to view reports, report data or contact information.

    Filing Schedules

    View a listing of the campaign finance report filing schedules for all candidates and committees.

    Recently Organized

    View a listing of newly organized candidates and committees, with links to their organizational documents.

    Download Filer Lists

    Download a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet or a tab-delimited text file of all filers who register with OCPF.

    Legal Resources

    OCPF welcomes requests for advisory opinions or confidential requests for reviews via email. For more information, please visit the Legal Questions section of our Legal Resources page.

    Searchable Database – For information only

    Agency Actions

    OCPF audits all campaign finance reports and reviews complaints alleging violations of the campaign finance law. View the public records of the enforcement actions or rulings resulting from OCPF’s audits and reviews.

    MGL Ch. 55 MA Campaign Finance Law

    Chapter 55 is the Massachusetts general law governing campaign finance.

    OCPF Regulations CMR 970

    The campaign finance activity regulations promulgated by OCPF.

    Advisory Opinions

    OCPF issues opinions concerning prospective activities in response to questions by candidates, committees and the public. View a chronological index of all AOs issued by OCPF since 1982, with links to the full text of each opinion.

    Statewide Office

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    Seats in the State Senate and State House (General Court).

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    Depository Municipal Office

    Mayor or City Councilor in Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Fall River, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, New Bedford, Newton, Quincy, Somerville, Springfield and Worcester.

    Mayor (population up to 75,000)

    State Political Action Committees (PACs)

    Committees that raise and spend money to support or oppose one or more statewide, legislative, district & county, mayoral or some city council candidates, based upon stated principles or interests. These PACs organize and file periodic reports with OCPF.

    County and District Offices

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    A political action committee that only receives donations to make independent expenditures, and only makes independent expenditures.

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    Segregated Fund Accounts

    Legal defense, recount or inaugural funds.

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    PACs concerned only with candidates in a specific city or town. These PACs organize and file periodic reports with their local election officials.

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    OCPF Tutorials

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    Campaign financeon YouTube

    Visit OCPF’s YouTube channel to see more instructional videos and recorded seminars conferences.

    Additional Help s expenditures. In addition, these candidates and committees file twice-monthly reports of contribution information, and, if applicable, detailed monthly reports for any reimbursement, subvendor or credit card payments made by the committee.

    These candidates and committees are also responsible for filing year-end summary reports.

    75,000+ Populations This includes the communities of Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Fall River, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, New Bedford, Newton, Quincy, Somerville, Springfield and Worcester. State Party Committees The state committees of political parties organized under M.G.L. chapter 52, section 1. State Political Action Committees (PACs) PACs and People s Committees.

    Non-depository candidates and committees are candidates for the state legislature or the Barnstable Assembly of Delegates, local party committees, ballot question committees and the mayoral candidates in cities with populations less than 75,000, which include:


    Campaign Finance Reform – Naheed Nenshi for Mayor, campaign finance reform.#Campaign #finance #reform


    Campaign Finance Reform

    1. Home
    2. Policy
    3. Campaign Finance Reform

    Campaign finance reform

    If I am re-elected as your mayor, I will continue to advocate for new provincial rules to ensure we have a Smarter City Hall. The provincial rules established under the Local Authorities Elections Act should limit the timing of campaign donations, establish better rules for the use of campaign surpluses, set a spending limit of $0.65 per resident, address the growing role of anonymous third parties attempting to influence Calgarians, and force all candidates to disclose their donors prior to Election Day.

    Financial disclosure

    The current rules require that municipal campaign donations only be disclosed long after the election is over. This means that Calgarians do not have the ability to see who is contributing financially to a campaign prior to casting their ballot unless the candidates step up and voluntarily disclose their donors. I proactively disclosed my donors and will do so regularly until Election Day. I challenge all candidates for council to show leadership and disclose their donors before Election Day. See my disclosure list here.

    As there will inevitably be some candidates who choose not to voluntarily disclose their donors, the rules should be changed to mandate disclosure of the names of donors and the categories of each donation amount prior to Election Day.

    Third-Party spending

    Encouraging participation in our elections is critical to the health and success of our democracy. But we need to be wary of those who would try to influence Calgarians without accountability by spreading misinformation and refusing to reveal the identities of their funders. If I am re-elected mayor, I will work with the provincial government to establish rules to counter the influence of anonymously-funded American-style political groups. The best remedy to the undue influence of these groups is to mandate strong, recurring disclosure requirements for their funders with significant, escalating financial penalties for non-compliance.

    Limiting when donations are allowed

    Campaign donations are currently allowed at any time, up to a maximum of $5,000 per year. This means that over a four year term an incumbent mayor or councillor could raise $20,000 from a single donor. This provides incumbents with an unfair advantage over potential challengers. My solution is to only allow donations during the calendar year of the election. This would allow adequate time before an election to fundraise and immediately afterward to address any campaign debts. I have only sought donations for my election campaigns during the calendar year of the municipal election.

    Spending limits

    Currently, no spending limits are in place for municipal campaigns. This gives incumbent members of council a significant advantage over their challengers trying to get their name out there. I believe that the province should establish a spending limit of about $0.65 per resident. The limit could be adjusted based on the civic census and adjusted for inflation between election cycles. In the mayoral race, this rule would cap campaign spending at $812,000 in 2017, which is more than enough to run a successful campaign. In this election, I commit to spending less than $0.65 per Calgarian.

    Campaign surpluses

    Currently any money not spent in a municipal campaign period can be carried over for a future election. Allowing these surpluses to be carried over means that incumbent members of council can begin the next election with a potentially massive financial advantage over their opponents.

    I believe that all campaign surpluses should be donated to the City or to a registered charity after the election in order to give challengers an equal playing field. In this election, whether I win or lose, I commit to donating any campaign surplus. If re-elected as your mayor, I will push for new provincial rules mandating that campaign surpluses be donated.

    Read Naheed’s Full Platform

    Sign in if you’d like new recruits to be credited to you.


    Campaign Finance and Lobbying Activities, California Secretary of State, campaign finance.#Campaign #finance


    Campaign Finance and Lobbying Activities

    The Political Reform Division administers provisions of California’s Political Reform Act, including the law’s most fundamental purpose of ensuring that “receipts and expenditures in election campaigns should be fully and truthfully disclosed in order that the voters may be fully informed and the activities of lobbyists should be regulated and their finances disclosed. “

    The Political Reform Act was adopted as a statewide initiative (Proposition 9) by an overwhelming vote of the electorate in 1974. The law requires detailed disclosure of the role of money in California politics. This includes the disclosure of contributions and expenditures in connection with campaigns supporting or opposing state and local candidates and ballot measures as well as the disclosure of expenditures made in connection with lobbying the State Legislature and attempting to influence administrative decisions of state government.

    Filing Information and Requirements

    Electronic Filing Information

    • Application for Password
    • Cal-Online Free Online Filing Forms
    • Approved Vendor Information

    Campaign Filing Requirements

    • Getting Started
    • Current Filing Schedules
    • Where to File
    • Penalties

    Campaign Disclosure Forms

    • Campaign Forms and Instructions

    Lobbying Filing Requirements

    • Ethics Training
    • Filing Deadlines
    • Required Documents for Registration, Amendment, Termination, and Withdrawal
    • Required Documents for Quarterly Disclosure Reports
    • Penalties

    Lobbying Forms

    • Lobbying Forms and Instructions

    What is Cal-Access?

    Cal-Access provides financial information supplied by state candidates, donors, lobbyists, and others. Simply start by selecting either Campaign Finance Activity, Lobbying Activity, or Cal-Access Resources and we will guide you to the information.

    Campaign finance

    Campaign finance

    Campaign finance

    Other Resources

    Campaign Finance and Lobbying

    The Political Reform Division, Secretary of State, is located at 1500 – 11th Street, Room 495, Sacramento, CA 95814, phone (916) 653-6224.


    OCPF – Welcome to the OCPF Home Page, campaign finance.#Campaign #finance


    campaign finance

    All filers registered with OCPF can file their periodic campaign finance reports and late contribution reports online using Reporter 6. File Online

    Ballot Question Spending CPF22 or 22A Reports

    CPF 22 ballot question spending reports are filed by individuals, for-profit business corporations, associations and organizations. CPF 22A reports are filed by the treasurers of cities, towns, or other governmental units.

    Electioneering Communications

    Individuals, groups and organizations can file their reports of electioneering activity online.

    Independent Expenditures CPF 18A Reports

    Reports of independent expenditure activity can be filed online. To begin, select your filer type:

    IEPAC reports include contributor information.

    Report Log

    View a listing of the most recently filed reports, in descending order by filing date.

    IE PAC Independent Expenditures

    View independent expenditure reports filed by IE PACs. The reports are grouped by year and can be filtered by filer, candidate, or date.

    Electioneering Communications

    View reports of electioneering communications filed by individuals, groups and associations. The reports are grouped by year and can be filtered by filer, candidate or date.

    Independent Expenditures

    View reports of independent expenditures filed by individuals, groups, associations, corporations, labor unions, political committees or other entities. The reports are grouped by year and can be filtered by filer, candidate or date.

    Special Elections

    View the reports filed by candidates in special elections, grouped by seat.

    Legislative Races

    View reports filed by legislative candidates, grouped by seat, from 2002 to the present.

    PACs and People’s Committees

    View report filed by political action committees, grouped by year from 2002 to the present.

    Ballot Questions

    View ballot question committee reports, grouped by ballot question.

    Donations Segregated Funds

    View reports filed by candidates with recount, legal defense or inaugural fund accounts.

    Campaign finance

    Charts & Graphs

    Legislative race and ballot question spending charts.

    Search Contributions and Expenditures

    Search all itemized contributions and expenditures for all registered filers.

    Download Data

    Download our entire electronic report database, account type listings, filer listings or district code listings.

    Filer Reports

    Browse filer reports and data.

    Registered Filers

    Browse a listing of all candidates and committees registered with OCPF to view reports, report data or contact information.

    Filing Schedules

    View a listing of the campaign finance report filing schedules for all candidates and committees.

    Recently Organized

    View a listing of newly organized candidates and committees, with links to their organizational documents.

    Download Filer Lists

    Download a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet or a tab-delimited text file of all filers who register with OCPF.

    Legal Resources

    OCPF welcomes requests for advisory opinions or confidential requests for reviews via email. For more information, please visit the Legal Questions section of our Legal Resources page.

    Searchable Database – For information only

    Agency Actions

    OCPF audits all campaign finance reports and reviews complaints alleging violations of the campaign finance law. View the public records of the enforcement actions or rulings resulting from OCPF’s audits and reviews.

    MGL Ch. 55 MA Campaign Finance Law

    Chapter 55 is the Massachusetts general law governing campaign finance.

    OCPF Regulations CMR 970

    The campaign finance activity regulations promulgated by OCPF.

    Advisory Opinions

    OCPF issues opinions concerning prospective activities in response to questions by candidates, committees and the public. View a chronological index of all AOs issued by OCPF since 1982, with links to the full text of each opinion.

    Statewide Office

    Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, State Secretary, State Treasurer or State Auditor.

    House and Senate

    Seats in the State Senate and State House (General Court).

    Local Offices (Files Locally)

    All municipal offices with reporting requirements to local election officials. For example, school committee candidates, selectmen, and city councilors in cities with populations of less than 75,000.

    Depository Municipal Office

    Mayor or City Councilor in Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Fall River, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, New Bedford, Newton, Quincy, Somerville, Springfield and Worcester.

    Mayor (population up to 75,000)

    State Political Action Committees (PACs)

    Committees that raise and spend money to support or oppose one or more statewide, legislative, district & county, mayoral or some city council candidates, based upon stated principles or interests. These PACs organize and file periodic reports with OCPF.

    County and District Offices

    County Clerks of Court, Commissioners & Treasurers; Registers of Deeds & Probate; District Attorneys; Sheriffs and Suffolk County Clerks of Superior & Supreme Judicial Courts; Governor’s Council.

    Local Political Party Committee

    Ward, Town or City Committees of a State Political Party.

    Independent Expenditure PAC

    A political action committee that only receives donations to make independent expenditures, and only makes independent expenditures.

    State Ballot Question Committee

    For questions appearing on the ballot of the next state election.

    Municipal Ballot Question Committee

    For questions appearing on the ballot of a city or town election.

    Segregated Fund Accounts

    Legal defense, recount or inaugural funds.

    Local Political Action Committees

    PACs concerned only with candidates in a specific city or town. These PACs organize and file periodic reports with their local election officials.

    Popular Training Videos

    For Depository Candidates & Committees
    For Non-Depository Candidates and Committees
    For Municipal Candidates and Committees who File Locally
    OCPF Tutorials

    OCPFReports

    Campaign finance

    Campaign financeon YouTube

    Visit OCPF’s YouTube channel to see more instructional videos and recorded seminars conferences.

    Additional Help s expenditures. In addition, these candidates and committees file twice-monthly reports of contribution information, and, if applicable, detailed monthly reports for any reimbursement, subvendor or credit card payments made by the committee.

    These candidates and committees are also responsible for filing year-end summary reports.

    75,000+ Populations This includes the communities of Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Fall River, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, New Bedford, Newton, Quincy, Somerville, Springfield and Worcester. State Party Committees The state committees of political parties organized under M.G.L. chapter 52, section 1. State Political Action Committees (PACs) PACs and People s Committees.

    Non-depository candidates and committees are candidates for the state legislature or the Barnstable Assembly of Delegates, local party committees, ballot question committees and the mayoral candidates in cities with populations less than 75,000, which include:


    Campaign Finance Reform – Naheed Nenshi for Mayor, campaign finance reform.#Campaign #finance #reform


    Campaign Finance Reform

    1. Home
    2. Policy
    3. Campaign Finance Reform

    Campaign finance reform

    If I am re-elected as your mayor, I will continue to advocate for new provincial rules to ensure we have a Smarter City Hall. The provincial rules established under the Local Authorities Elections Act should limit the timing of campaign donations, establish better rules for the use of campaign surpluses, set a spending limit of $0.65 per resident, address the growing role of anonymous third parties attempting to influence Calgarians, and force all candidates to disclose their donors prior to Election Day.

    Financial disclosure

    The current rules require that municipal campaign donations only be disclosed long after the election is over. This means that Calgarians do not have the ability to see who is contributing financially to a campaign prior to casting their ballot unless the candidates step up and voluntarily disclose their donors. I proactively disclosed my donors and will do so regularly until Election Day. I challenge all candidates for council to show leadership and disclose their donors before Election Day. See my disclosure list here.

    As there will inevitably be some candidates who choose not to voluntarily disclose their donors, the rules should be changed to mandate disclosure of the names of donors and the categories of each donation amount prior to Election Day.

    Third-Party spending

    Encouraging participation in our elections is critical to the health and success of our democracy. But we need to be wary of those who would try to influence Calgarians without accountability by spreading misinformation and refusing to reveal the identities of their funders. If I am re-elected mayor, I will work with the provincial government to establish rules to counter the influence of anonymously-funded American-style political groups. The best remedy to the undue influence of these groups is to mandate strong, recurring disclosure requirements for their funders with significant, escalating financial penalties for non-compliance.

    Limiting when donations are allowed

    Campaign donations are currently allowed at any time, up to a maximum of $5,000 per year. This means that over a four year term an incumbent mayor or councillor could raise $20,000 from a single donor. This provides incumbents with an unfair advantage over potential challengers. My solution is to only allow donations during the calendar year of the election. This would allow adequate time before an election to fundraise and immediately afterward to address any campaign debts. I have only sought donations for my election campaigns during the calendar year of the municipal election.

    Spending limits

    Currently, no spending limits are in place for municipal campaigns. This gives incumbent members of council a significant advantage over their challengers trying to get their name out there. I believe that the province should establish a spending limit of about $0.65 per resident. The limit could be adjusted based on the civic census and adjusted for inflation between election cycles. In the mayoral race, this rule would cap campaign spending at $812,000 in 2017, which is more than enough to run a successful campaign. In this election, I commit to spending less than $0.65 per Calgarian.

    Campaign surpluses

    Currently any money not spent in a municipal campaign period can be carried over for a future election. Allowing these surpluses to be carried over means that incumbent members of council can begin the next election with a potentially massive financial advantage over their opponents.

    I believe that all campaign surpluses should be donated to the City or to a registered charity after the election in order to give challengers an equal playing field. In this election, whether I win or lose, I commit to donating any campaign surplus. If re-elected as your mayor, I will push for new provincial rules mandating that campaign surpluses be donated.

    Read Naheed’s Full Platform

    Sign in if you’d like new recruits to be credited to you.


    Campaign Finance Reform – Naheed Nenshi for Mayor, campaign finance reform.#Campaign #finance #reform


    Campaign Finance Reform

    1. Home
    2. Policy
    3. Campaign Finance Reform

    Campaign finance reform

    If I am re-elected as your mayor, I will continue to advocate for new provincial rules to ensure we have a Smarter City Hall. The provincial rules established under the Local Authorities Elections Act should limit the timing of campaign donations, establish better rules for the use of campaign surpluses, set a spending limit of $0.65 per resident, address the growing role of anonymous third parties attempting to influence Calgarians, and force all candidates to disclose their donors prior to Election Day.

    Financial disclosure

    The current rules require that municipal campaign donations only be disclosed long after the election is over. This means that Calgarians do not have the ability to see who is contributing financially to a campaign prior to casting their ballot unless the candidates step up and voluntarily disclose their donors. I proactively disclosed my donors and will do so regularly until Election Day. I challenge all candidates for council to show leadership and disclose their donors before Election Day. See my disclosure list here.

    As there will inevitably be some candidates who choose not to voluntarily disclose their donors, the rules should be changed to mandate disclosure of the names of donors and the categories of each donation amount prior to Election Day.

    Third-Party spending

    Encouraging participation in our elections is critical to the health and success of our democracy. But we need to be wary of those who would try to influence Calgarians without accountability by spreading misinformation and refusing to reveal the identities of their funders. If I am re-elected mayor, I will work with the provincial government to establish rules to counter the influence of anonymously-funded American-style political groups. The best remedy to the undue influence of these groups is to mandate strong, recurring disclosure requirements for their funders with significant, escalating financial penalties for non-compliance.

    Limiting when donations are allowed

    Campaign donations are currently allowed at any time, up to a maximum of $5,000 per year. This means that over a four year term an incumbent mayor or councillor could raise $20,000 from a single donor. This provides incumbents with an unfair advantage over potential challengers. My solution is to only allow donations during the calendar year of the election. This would allow adequate time before an election to fundraise and immediately afterward to address any campaign debts. I have only sought donations for my election campaigns during the calendar year of the municipal election.

    Spending limits

    Currently, no spending limits are in place for municipal campaigns. This gives incumbent members of council a significant advantage over their challengers trying to get their name out there. I believe that the province should establish a spending limit of about $0.65 per resident. The limit could be adjusted based on the civic census and adjusted for inflation between election cycles. In the mayoral race, this rule would cap campaign spending at $812,000 in 2017, which is more than enough to run a successful campaign. In this election, I commit to spending less than $0.65 per Calgarian.

    Campaign surpluses

    Currently any money not spent in a municipal campaign period can be carried over for a future election. Allowing these surpluses to be carried over means that incumbent members of council can begin the next election with a potentially massive financial advantage over their opponents.

    I believe that all campaign surpluses should be donated to the City or to a registered charity after the election in order to give challengers an equal playing field. In this election, whether I win or lose, I commit to donating any campaign surplus. If re-elected as your mayor, I will push for new provincial rules mandating that campaign surpluses be donated.

    Read Naheed’s Full Platform

    Sign in if you’d like new recruits to be credited to you.


    Campaign Finance Reform – Naheed Nenshi for Mayor, campaign finance reform.#Campaign #finance #reform


    Campaign Finance Reform

    1. Home
    2. Policy
    3. Campaign Finance Reform

    Campaign finance reform

    If I am re-elected as your mayor, I will continue to advocate for new provincial rules to ensure we have a Smarter City Hall. The provincial rules established under the Local Authorities Elections Act should limit the timing of campaign donations, establish better rules for the use of campaign surpluses, set a spending limit of $0.65 per resident, address the growing role of anonymous third parties attempting to influence Calgarians, and force all candidates to disclose their donors prior to Election Day.

    Financial disclosure

    The current rules require that municipal campaign donations only be disclosed long after the election is over. This means that Calgarians do not have the ability to see who is contributing financially to a campaign prior to casting their ballot unless the candidates step up and voluntarily disclose their donors. I proactively disclosed my donors and will do so regularly until Election Day. I challenge all candidates for council to show leadership and disclose their donors before Election Day. See my disclosure list here.

    As there will inevitably be some candidates who choose not to voluntarily disclose their donors, the rules should be changed to mandate disclosure of the names of donors and the categories of each donation amount prior to Election Day.

    Third-Party spending

    Encouraging participation in our elections is critical to the health and success of our democracy. But we need to be wary of those who would try to influence Calgarians without accountability by spreading misinformation and refusing to reveal the identities of their funders. If I am re-elected mayor, I will work with the provincial government to establish rules to counter the influence of anonymously-funded American-style political groups. The best remedy to the undue influence of these groups is to mandate strong, recurring disclosure requirements for their funders with significant, escalating financial penalties for non-compliance.

    Limiting when donations are allowed

    Campaign donations are currently allowed at any time, up to a maximum of $5,000 per year. This means that over a four year term an incumbent mayor or councillor could raise $20,000 from a single donor. This provides incumbents with an unfair advantage over potential challengers. My solution is to only allow donations during the calendar year of the election. This would allow adequate time before an election to fundraise and immediately afterward to address any campaign debts. I have only sought donations for my election campaigns during the calendar year of the municipal election.

    Spending limits

    Currently, no spending limits are in place for municipal campaigns. This gives incumbent members of council a significant advantage over their challengers trying to get their name out there. I believe that the province should establish a spending limit of about $0.65 per resident. The limit could be adjusted based on the civic census and adjusted for inflation between election cycles. In the mayoral race, this rule would cap campaign spending at $812,000 in 2017, which is more than enough to run a successful campaign. In this election, I commit to spending less than $0.65 per Calgarian.

    Campaign surpluses

    Currently any money not spent in a municipal campaign period can be carried over for a future election. Allowing these surpluses to be carried over means that incumbent members of council can begin the next election with a potentially massive financial advantage over their opponents.

    I believe that all campaign surpluses should be donated to the City or to a registered charity after the election in order to give challengers an equal playing field. In this election, whether I win or lose, I commit to donating any campaign surplus. If re-elected as your mayor, I will push for new provincial rules mandating that campaign surpluses be donated.

    Read Naheed’s Full Platform

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