How do I fund, or raise finance, for a franchise in the UK? #business #finance #software


#franchise finance

#

Franchise Banks

whichfranchise Finance

For over 18 years, whichfranchise has been providing prospective franchisees in the UK with information and advice on funding a franchise. We have, and continue to work with some of the leading banks in franchising as well as other franchise finance specialists. In our dedicated section to franchise funding you can enquire about how much money you can borrow as well as how to approach a bank for finance, you can put any franchise finance related questions you have to one of the leading franchise specialist bankers in the UK, identify the true cost of buying a franchise and the importance of having a business plan and what should be included in it.

Enquire about funding a franchise

If you are interested in a franchise and wish to find out more about how much money you can borrow towards it, you can contact Lloyds Bank franchise division for further information and/or an informal chat. Click here to contact Lloyds Bank

Funding a franchise advice

Buying a franchise is a big step and, in a lot of cases, a big investment for most. It is vital that you check how much finance is available to you. Knowing this will also help with your decision as to which franchises are available within your budget. Read more about how to raise finance and funding options available to you

Franchise business plan

The business plan has two main purposes – obtaining finance from the bank and clarifying your aims and objectives. Here we look at the importance of the business plan and what should be included in it. Read more

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Find out how much money you can borrow

Ask the finance expert

Richard Holden – Lloyds Bank

Richard Holden is Head of Franchising for Lloyds Bank. He has 32 years banking experience and has supported a wide range of businesses in the small business sector for many years. He is responsible for providing support to the Lloyds Bank Business Managers, assisting them in assessing proposals from prospective franchisees. He is also responsible for ensuring that the network of local business managers has up-to-date information on the franchise systems operating within the UK.

Cost of a franchise

When looking at the cost of a franchise it can sometimes be confusing with talk of franchisee fees, deposits, average cost etc. In this section we look at how to identify the total costs of a franchise including explaining the difference between franchise fee, deposits, working capital, as well as how to verify a franchisor’s projections.

  • Real cost of investing in a franchise
  • Franchise deposits
  • Franchise fees
  • Evaluating financial aspects of a franchise
  • How to verify a franchisor’s projections

How to approach a bank for finance

When it comes to financing a business start-up, banks are favorable to franchising. The regard lending to prospective franchisees looking at well-structured ethical franchise systems a safer option than someone starting from scratch on their own.


What Can You Do With a Bachelors in Finance? #swift #finance


#bachelor of finance

#

What Can You Do With a Bachelors in Finance?

A bachelor’s degree program in finance prepares graduates for many entry-level jobs, including financial planner, portfolio manager and financial analyst. Find out what other paths finance students can consider with a bachelor’s degree

Opportunities for Graduates with a Bachelor’s Degree in Finance

A bachelor’s degree in finance can open many doors for graduates, including access to entry-level positions in finance and business, certification as a finance professional and preparation for graduate programs. Undergraduate finance majors learn about various subjects, such as long-term financial planning, cost control and sound investing. Typical college courses include accounting, statistics, financial markets, international finance and financial statement analysis.

Entry-Level Finance Positions

While students have the option of pursuing either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in finance, both degree programs lead to the same entry-level positions. A Bachelor of Arts in Finance offers students a more broad, liberal arts approach to studying finance than a Bachelor of Science degree.

Finance majors often find employment opportunities in such areas as banking, investments and financial services. Typical employers include securities and commodities brokers, banks, insurance carriers, government agencies and real estate companies. Some entry-level positions in finance include:

  • Bank branch manager
  • Commercial lender
  • Financial analyst
  • Financial manager
  • Financial planner
  • Portfolio manager
  • Security analyst
  • Trust manager

Finance Certifications

Although it may not necessarily be a requirement, many positions encourage applicants to seek certification. Working as a financial analyst, for example, may require a Chartered Financial Analyst designation. A bachelor’s degree in finance is required for most certifications, and several years of work experience may be needed prior to becoming certified. Certification programs include, but aren’t limited to, Certified Public Finance Officers, Certified Management Accountant and Certified Healthcare Financial Professional.

Graduate Study

Laying the foundation for graduate school is especially important, since many corporate employers prefer, or even require, applicants to hold a master’s degree in finance. Students continuing their studies at the graduate level qualify for advanced job opportunities. A finance background lends itself to other graduate studies, including public administration, law and business. Upper-level career options exist in:

  • Corporate finance
  • Corporate treasury
  • Credit analysis
  • Equity research
  • Risk management

What Do You Want to Learn? #agricultural #finance


#personal finance

#

What Do You Want to Learn?

These lessons teach the basics of personal finance, what it is, our perspective, why it is important, and how we can be better stewards over our resources.

These lessons are a bit more advanced and detailed. We use the MoneyWise workshops and other intermediate lessons to help you understand financial principles as you learn to live within your means, get out of debt, and save for long-term goals.

These lessons are for those who already have a good background in personal finance, They include courses for older college students, young married/single adults, returned missionaries, and freshman college students. We also include courses on retirement planning and advanced investing. These lessons cover all areas of personal finance, in great detail from perspectives, to budgets, to investments and retirement planning.


How do I fund, or raise finance, for a franchise in the UK? #auto #finance


#franchise finance

#

Franchise Banks

whichfranchise Finance

For over 18 years, whichfranchise has been providing prospective franchisees in the UK with information and advice on funding a franchise. We have, and continue to work with some of the leading banks in franchising as well as other franchise finance specialists. In our dedicated section to franchise funding you can enquire about how much money you can borrow as well as how to approach a bank for finance, you can put any franchise finance related questions you have to one of the leading franchise specialist bankers in the UK, identify the true cost of buying a franchise and the importance of having a business plan and what should be included in it.

Enquire about funding a franchise

If you are interested in a franchise and wish to find out more about how much money you can borrow towards it, you can contact Lloyds Bank franchise division for further information and/or an informal chat. Click here to contact Lloyds Bank

Funding a franchise advice

Buying a franchise is a big step and, in a lot of cases, a big investment for most. It is vital that you check how much finance is available to you. Knowing this will also help with your decision as to which franchises are available within your budget. Read more about how to raise finance and funding options available to you

Franchise business plan

The business plan has two main purposes – obtaining finance from the bank and clarifying your aims and objectives. Here we look at the importance of the business plan and what should be included in it. Read more

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Find out how much money you can borrow

Ask the finance expert

Richard Holden – Lloyds Bank

Richard Holden is Head of Franchising for Lloyds Bank. He has 32 years banking experience and has supported a wide range of businesses in the small business sector for many years. He is responsible for providing support to the Lloyds Bank Business Managers, assisting them in assessing proposals from prospective franchisees. He is also responsible for ensuring that the network of local business managers has up-to-date information on the franchise systems operating within the UK.

Cost of a franchise

When looking at the cost of a franchise it can sometimes be confusing with talk of franchisee fees, deposits, average cost etc. In this section we look at how to identify the total costs of a franchise including explaining the difference between franchise fee, deposits, working capital, as well as how to verify a franchisor’s projections.

  • Real cost of investing in a franchise
  • Franchise deposits
  • Franchise fees
  • Evaluating financial aspects of a franchise
  • How to verify a franchisor’s projections

How to approach a bank for finance

When it comes to financing a business start-up, banks are favorable to franchising. The regard lending to prospective franchisees looking at well-structured ethical franchise systems a safer option than someone starting from scratch on their own.


Financing a new laptop? Do the math first #behavioural #finance


#finance a laptop

#

Financing a new laptop? Do the math first

Dear Opening Credits,
I’m new to credit and was looking around online to purchase a MacBook Pro from Apple for $1,499. I was looking to finance it through Barclaycard with Apple rewards; they have an offer that says 18 months of financing with 0 percent APR if paid in full before promo time. I saw that people say it’s a good card for purchasing expensive Apple products, but how does it work? People get approved for $1,500 and more. Do I use the money I’m approved for to pay the laptop off in full or every month do I deduct to pay for it? — Bryant

Dear Bryant,
If you were to qualify for this credit card (and given the information you’ve provided, it’s a mighty big if ), you could charge the cost of the desired Apple item and walk home with it immediately. This Barclaycard suspends all interest fees for a specific time frame, unlike a credit card that does not offer a 0 percent promotional offer where interest would be added to the balance if you don’t pay the full amount in a month or so.

This particular card would give you about a year and a half to satisfy the full balance with no finance charges added to the purchase price. However, if any amount remains unpaid after that 18-month period is up — even if it’s just a few bucks — or if you are ever late with a payment, all of the deferred interest will be applied to the outstanding debt. At that stage, the sweet deal suddenly becomes a sour one.

Just how unpleasant it will be depends on the interest rate. According this card’s terms and conditions, the APR is either 13.99, 19.99 or 26.99 percent. What you might be offered is contingent on your credit rating. So, if you were to get this account and did get socked with the accumulated finance fees, they would look something like this:

13.99% APR = about $348
19.99% APR = about $520
26.99% APR = about $738

Clearly, the interest rate makes a difference in the final bill, but in all cases, you’d owe a lot more than you anticipated.

To avoid this situation, you must make sure the entire debt is deleted by the last month of the deal. As you don’t have to account for finance fees, the calculation for what you’d need to send on a monthly basis is simple: $1,500 divided by 18 months is about $84 per month.

You wouldn’t want to cut it that close, though. It would be a good idea to increase the payments to at least $100, as that would guarantee a complete payoff within 15 months. Figure the highest amount over $84 that you can reasonably afford to send, then have that sum automatically deducted from your checking account and sent to the creditor. This way you’d also ensure a perfect payment pattern, which would not only hike up your credit scores, but would prevent the interest rate from kicking in.

The reason I hesitated about you getting this card in the first place, though, is that you’re new to credit. Without an established credit history, you wouldn’t have a credit score for the issuer to assess. This will be a major stumbling block to being approved.

Most issuers expect applicants to have a good credit score (plus meet income requirements) to qualify for 0-percent credit offers. To achieve a high score, you need to have a lengthy history of borrowing money and repaying it responsibly. If you don’t, don’t bother trying for this product. To find out your credit score, go to myFICO.com and pay about $20 for one of the scores from one of the top three credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian or TransUnion.

Then consider a starter account, such as a secured credit card. instead of the Barclaycard. The credit line on a secured card may not be large enough to charge the price of the laptop, but if you use the card right for at least a year, you’d be well on your way to a really good rating — and might be eligible for the Barclaycard and other low rate promotional cards later.

In the meantime, use the cash in your checking account to buy the laptop or start saving for it. If you could sock $375 away a month, it would be yours in four months, no plastic needed.

Meet CreditCards.com’s reader Q A experts

Does a personal finance problem have you worried? Monday through Saturday, CreditCards.com’s Q A experts answer questions from readers. Ask a question . or click on any expert to see their previous answers.

Sally Herigstad,
To Her Credit

  • Susan Keating,
    Credit Smart

  • Barry Paperno,
    Speaking of Credit

  • Elaine Pofeldt,
    Your Business Credit

  • Erica Sandberg,
    Opening Credits

    Published: February 25, 2015

    Join the discussion

    We encourage an active and insightful conversation among our users. Please help us keep our community civil and respectful. For your safety, do not disclose confidential or personal information such as bank account numbers or social security numbers. Anything you post may be disclosed, published, transmitted or reused.

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  • What can I do with an accountancy and finance degree? #pc #finance


    #degree in finance

    #

    Accountancy and finance

    As well as providing a route into financial professions, a degree in accountancy and finance develops skills that are useful in a range of sectors

    Job options

    Jobs directly related to your degree include:

    Jobs where your degree would be useful include:

    Remember that many employers accept applications from graduates with any degree subject, so don’t restrict your thinking to the jobs listed here.

    Work experience

    In order to become a qualified accountant, you will need to obtain a professional accountancy qualification. Work experience can be very beneficial in helping you to gain the skills and experience that employers seek. If your course did not include a work placement, seek some paid or unpaid experience in the field that interests you.

    This could include part-time work in a local accountancy firm or work experience in the finance department of any organisation. Experience that shows you have office and admin skills, as well as the ability to work with numbers and budgets, will be helpful.

    Search for placements and find out more about work experience and internships .

    Typical employers

    Opportunities are widely available with accountancy firms, investment banks, high street banks, insurance companies, building societies, management consultancies and public sector employers.

    The most prominent graduate recruiters are the very large multinational accountancy firms. They use large-scale recruitment campaigns to attract the most promising graduates and have high-minimum requirements. There are also opportunities in small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that specialise in a particular type of work or local area.

    In the UK, a cluster of public sector jobs are available in central London with others available nationwide.

    Skills for your CV

    Accountancy and finance degrees develop your understanding of accountancy practices, commerce, industry and finance. As well as developing a range of subject-specific and technical skills, you also gain more general skills including:

    • knowledge and awareness of business organisations;
    • numerical and quantitative skills;
    • problem-solving and analytical ability;
    • oral and written communication skills;
    • ability to argue your case and negotiate;
    • knowledge of global business issues and language skills, particularly if you study European or international finance;
    • entrepreneurship.

    Advertisement

    Further study

    Accountancy and finance graduates often go into posts that require further professional accountancy qualifications. such as the:

    • Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) qualification;
    • Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) certificate;
    • Association of Accounting Technicians (AAT) qualification.

    Accountancy graduates may have exemption from some of these examinations, depending on the modules and credits they have achieved in their degrees.

    Some postgraduate courses train you to work in a more specialised area of the financial industry, for example, the MSc in actuarial science. It is also possible to study for a PhD in specific areas of finance, such as banking or trade statistics.

    For more information on further study and to find a course that interests you, see Masters degrees and search postgraduate courses .

    What do accountancy and finance graduates do?

    More than two-thirds of accountancy and finance graduates are in employment six months after graduating. A fifth of these are working as chartered and certified accountants with others working in finance administrative roles.

    Five of the top ten occupations held by finance and accountancy graduates are directly related to their degrees and accounted for 45.5% of those in employment in the UK.


    Your debit card will get a chip soon, how do i get a debit card.#How #do #i #get #a #debit #card


    #

    Banking Blog

    The next debit card you get will probably have a little golden chip in it, and that’s a good thing.

    The chip will make it much less likely that someone can counterfeit your debit card and go on a shopping spree, so you won’t have to spend any time calling your bank and arguing with them about who bought that stuff, or waiting for the bank to refund your money.

    How do i get a debit card

    For banks, it’s maybe not such a great thing. It will cost them about $1.4 billion to issue chipped “EMV” cards, for Europay, MasterCard and Visa. So why are they going to do it anyway? In part because of ratcheting pressure from MasterCard and Visa.

    ‘Liability shift’ coming

    A deadline is rapidly approaching called the “liability shift.” On Oct. 1, 2015, MasterCard will reprogram its computers to change the way it handles who pays for fraud to encourage EMV chip adoption.

    Normally it goes like this:

    1. A thief goes to a retailer or other merchant, buys a bunch of stuff on your stolen or counterfeited debit card.
    2. You notice it on your checking account statement and call the bank to complain.
    3. Your bank, the issuer of the debit card, ultimately covers the cost of the fraud.

    After the liability shift, it will go like this:

    1. A thief makes a bunch of fraudulent purchases.
    2. You notice it and complain.
    3. Whoever failed to adopt EMV technology — the issuing bank or the merchant — has to cover the cost of the debit card fraud.

    “Everyone in the system is allowed to decide when and how they’re going to migrate to EMV,” says Carolyn Balfany, senior vice president of product delivery at MasterCard. “What the liability shift says is, whoever does not invest in the upgrade to the technology in this pursuit of eliminating fraud will be responsible for any resulting fraud.”

    Consumers don’t bear liability (at least not yet)

    Notice that neither of the above scenarios involves you paying for the fraudulent purchases.

    That’s important because in other countries where EMV chips has been adopted, including the United Kingdom, liability for some fraudulent purchases has shifted to consumers. In those countries, if someone manages to commit fraud with your debit card, you may be held liable because you presumably did not guard your payment details carefully enough.

    That’s not the case in the U.S., Balfany says.

    “You as a consumer are never responsible,” Balfany says. “Whether it’s magstripe, chip, I don’t care. You’re never liable.”

    That could change in a few years.

    Unlike the European version of EMV, American debit card holders won’t have to use a PIN when they make credit card type purchases right away — unlike the European version of EMV cards — but that shift is coming in 2020, Balfany says.

    But when U.S. banks do adopt a PIN for all card transactions, it could create headaches for victims of fraud. That’s because it could be more difficult for debit card holders to convince a bank that they’re a real victim.

    “We’ll have to see how that nets out,” Balfany says. “Typically, consumers are not liable,” except in cases that look like “friendly fraud,” where an associate of the cardholder makes purchases that the cardholder then denies responsibility for.

    “Then really it becomes something that needs to be resolved between the bank and the cardholder,” Balfany says.

    What’s an EMV anyway?

    You know all those data breaches at large retailers you keep hearing about? Part of the reason that criminals are so eager to capture the payment information from consumers’ debit cards is it lets them print counterfeit cards and use them to make as many fraudulent purchases as possible before getting shut down.

    The magnetic stripe technology now in use makes that pretty simple. You can go online right now and buy a printer capable of replicating debit cards by the hundreds if you have the necessary numbers handy.

    With EMV chips, a thief would have to replicate the exact construction and programming of the chip, and have it solve what amounts to a difficult math problem in the exact same way as the original chip would have. That’s a lot tougher than replicating a simple magnetic stripe, assuming it can be done at all.

    “This is hugely significant because of the rate of counterfeit fraud,” Balfany says.

    However, to make EMV work, you need a chip card and a chip terminal to read it. Banks, which will have to pay for issuing the new EMV cards, have been reluctant to shell out the cash to do so. But the closer we get to the liability shift, the prospect of footing the bill for fraud may be a powerful motivator.

    “The end game that everybody wants is to create what we call chip-on-chip transactions, because we want chip cards to show up at chip terminals, so that it’s a more secure transaction and fraud just moves out of the system,” Balfany says. “The real point is to create a point in time where hopefully most are investing to upgrade.”

    What do you think? Do you want a chip in your card to prevent fraud?

    Update: An earlier version of this post mistakenly said that under the current liability structure, merchants typically cover the cost of fraud. Actually, that cost is typically covered by the bank who issues the debit card.


    What Do You Need to Be a Police Officer? #what #do #you #need #to #go #to #college, #what #do #you #need #to #be #a #police #officer


    #

    What Do You Need to Be a Police Officer?

    $58,320 (for police and sheriff’s patrol officers)

    Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

    As first responders to crime and other emergencies, police officers pursue and arrest perpetrators, contain situations and ensure civilian safety. Officers conduct investigations at crime scenes, which may involve talking with witnesses, obtaining evidence and determining potential suspects. To become a police officer, individuals need to meet physical and educational requirements, as well as complete a state-approved police academy training program.

    Let’s look at the steps it takes to become a police officer.

    Step 1: Take Post-Secondary Courses

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), before becoming a police officer, the first step applicants need to take is to meet the minimum educational requirements, which usually include a high school diploma or its equivalent. Most law enforcement agencies require that police officer applicants complete some college-level courses prior to entering police academy. Earning an undergraduate degree may also be required for some police officer positions, but that requirement varies by department.

    Most individuals enroll in criminal justice or police science degree programs. Coursework in criminal justice degree programs includes criminology, evidence gathering, law enforcement strategies and constitutional rights. Police science degree programs require similar coursework, but these programs usually offer more opportunities for students to specialize through various degree concentrations, such as police administration or crime scene investigations. Furthermore, some police science degree programs require students to be simultaneously enrolled in police academy.

    Step 2: Pass Background Checks and Physical Exams

    The next step is to pass a thorough background check. Depending on the state, the background check process may include interviews of an applicant’s acquaintances and family members, a criminal record review and a credit history check. To become a police officer, applicants must also pass physical examinations, which include testing an individual’s sense of hearing and sight and verifying a person’s level of strength, stamina, dexterity and overall agility. Some states may also require that applicants pass a psychiatric evaluation to verify if individuals can handle stressful situations.

    Find schools that offer these popular programs

    • Corrections Admin
    • Corrections, Probation, and Parole
    • Criminal Justice and Safety Studies
    • Criminal Science
    • Forensic Science
    • Juvenile Corrections
    • Law Enforcement Administration
    • Police Science and Law Enforcement
    • Securities Services Mgmt
    • Security and Theft Prevention Services

    Step 3: Choose an Area of Specialty

    A police station consists of several specialty departments, including property crimes, narcotics and organized crime, so, the third step to take when becoming a police officer is to choose a specialty. If you want to work in one of these specialty departments, it could involve taking additional coursework while enrolled in police academy. Not all police academies train candidates for each department specialty, so individuals may need to compare academy programs to find the best options.

    Besides specializing in a specific department, some individuals may want to work in specific locations. For instance, those who want to work at the local level may choose to work for cities, towns or universities, and those who want to enforce the law on the freeways and highways may want to join the highway patrol or sheriff’s department. State and federal police positions are also available, but often require more training and experience. Working as a police officer for some of the locations listed above may require completing additional training programs other than basic police academy training program.

    Step 4: Complete Police Academy

    Individuals need to complete police academy in order to be a police officer. Each state has different police academy requirements, and police officers trained out-of-state may have to take additional courses to meet state requirements.

    Several institutions split up police academy training programs into two distinct areas, including classroom learning and physical training. Classroom coursework covers patrolling procedures, police skills, first aid and police technology. Physical training includes stamina and strength building, firearms techniques, escorting criminals, defensive driving and self-defense.

    The BLS estimates a 4% job growth for police and detectives in the 2014-2024 decade. In May 2015, the median annual wage of police and sheriff’s patrol officers were $58,320.

    To become a police officer, you need to complete training at a police academy, meet physical and mental requirements, and pass a background check.

    Next: View Programs

    A career as a police officer can be both exciting and deeply rewarding, but may not be right for everyone. Is it the right fit.

    Learn how to become a state police officer. Research the education, training, information and experience required for starting.

    Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a certified police officer. Get a quick view of the requirements -.

    Becoming a police officer requires either a little college coursework or none at all. Learn about job duties and police academy.


    RN vs #what #do #you #need #for #nursing #school


    #

    RN vs. BSN: What You Should Know

    Nursing always looks so simple in the movies stick a patient with a needle, take their vitals, save their life and move on to the next patient.

    This should come as no surprise, but Hollywood tends to glamorize and oversimplify, especially when it comes to the details of a career as complex as nursing.

    As you ve likely discovered in your research, a nurse is never just a nurse a nurse can be a licensed practical nurse (LPN), registered nurse (RN), nurse practitioner (NP) or numerous other nursing job titles. So it makes sense that nurses have different levels of education that reflect their varied qualifications and expertise. They can have an associate degree in nursing (ADN), Bachelor of Science in nursing (BSN), Master of Science in nursing (MSN), or even a PhD in nursing.

    So how do you know which path is right for you?

    We ve already covered the LPN versus RN debate. now let s explore RN versus BSN. It should be noted that this isn t really an apples to apples comparison; RN is a job title while BSN is a degree. Even so, this remains a confusing topic for those unfamiliar with the field.

    RN vs. BSN: education requirements

    The first thing you should know is that becoming an RN means passing the NCLEX exam. There is no way around it.

    To be eligible to sit for the NCLEX you must first earn either an associate degree in nursing (ADN) or a Bachelor of Science in nursing (BSN). The former requires completion of a 21-month program at a career-focused college. The latter is generally a 4-year commitment up front but results in a higher academic credential something hospitals across the country are seeking in greater numbers.

    In the end, the outcome is essentially the same.

    The major difference is the path and time commitment required to become an RN. You can go straight to the job market as an RN or you can further your education with a BSN degree. If you decide on going the ADN route but eventually want to earn the higher academic credential, you can work towards the higher credential in an RN to BSN program. often online in as little as 12 months.*

    RN vs. BSN: job types

    Well this ought to be simple if you have a nursing degree, you re going to be a nurse, right? Yes, but there s more to it.

    RNs perform the typical nursing duties that are most commonly portrayed in movies and on TV they chart patient symptoms, operate medical equipment, educate patients on illness and work as part of a medical team, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

    But having a BSN under your belt provides a greater variety of job options. A nurse with a BSN may do the same things as an RN, or they may choose to work in public health or be a nurse educator. Public health nurses generally educate communities on health issues, while nurse educators prepare the next generation of LPNs and RNs. Nurses in those professions need to have a BSN to even be considered for employment, says Dr. Iris Cornell, dean of Rasmussen College s RN to BSN program.

    RN vs. BSN: job outlook salary

    You may already know that nursing is in high demand. but you re probably wondering what amount of education you ll need to be eligible for one of these in-demand positions. To answer that, we used real-time job analysis software from Burning-Glass.com to find the preferred education level of employers who are seeking nurses.*

    The data helped us identify the level of education employers are seeking in nurses. Here s what we found:

    • Post-secondary or associate degree (58 percent)
    • Bachelor s degree (34 percent)
    • Graduate or professional degree (23 percent)
    • High school or vocational training (3 percent)

    The observant part of you may be thinking, Hey! That adds up to more than 100 percent! This is likely explained by job postings that list both associate degree and bachelor s degree in their educational requirements, resulting in a double count. No matter how you slice it, these statistics show that a RN with an associate s degree is qualified for around 58 percent of available nursing-related jobs, while a nurse with a BSN qualifies for those plus the bachelor s degree jobs, or nearly 92 percent of all nursing vacancies over the past year.

    When it comes to salary, an RN is an RN the 2012 median pay for RNs was $65,470 , according to the BLS. An RN with a BSN can expect to earn slightly more than RNs with an associate degree, but perhaps the bigger opportunity for higher earning potential comes in the form of the specializations or managerial roles that become available further down on the career path of a BSN holder.

    RN vs. BSN: bottom line

    By now you should realize it s not really a matter of RN versus BSN. Becoming an RN is the destination; earning a BSN is one of the routes to reach that destination.

    So, what s the best route to a nursing career? It all depends on what you want. Both an ADN and a BSN will have you eligible for RN licensure, but more and more hospitals are pushing for nurses with BSNs.

    If you decide you d rather pursue the higher credential after you re already working as an RN, learn more about what to expect in an RN to BSN online program .

    *Time to complete is dependent on accepted transfer credits and courses completed each quarter.

    **Source: Burning-Glass.com (analysis of 911,981 nurse job postings, 8/01/2014 7/31/2015)

    EDITOR S NOTE: This article was originally published in Aug. 2013. It has since been updated to include information relevant to 2015.

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    Will is a Content Marketing Specialist at Collegis Education. He researches and writes student-focused articles on a variety of topics for Rasmussen College. He is passionate about learning and enjoys writing engaging content to help current and future students on their path to a rewarding education.

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