Student Finance, A guide to student finance, student finance contact.#Student #finance #contact


Student Finance

The cost of a college education is getting higher. Parents aren’t always able to fully fund their child’s education, so many students are looking for other options.

Luckily, student finance is available to help offset college expenses. There are many types of student finance. Availability is based on each individual student’s financial situation, mental and physical well-being, course load, and area of study.

Full-time students can receive student finance from the government. This student finance can come in the form of loans, which must be repaid after graduation, or grants, which do not require repayment.

What is student finance

Student finance can be used to cover the cost of tuition (loans for fees) or the cost of living (loans for maintenance). Additionally, student finance options can be combined. Some students take out loans to pay for expenses that their grants don’t cover.

Interest accrues on student finance from the date students receive them to the date they finish repaying them. The interest rate is linked to the rate of inflation, so the amount of student finance repaid is the same in real terms as the amount borrowed. Student loans can be obtained through the government or through private commercial lenders.

In addition to government assistance, student finance is also available from colleges. Students who don’t qualify for other types of student finance, or who need more help than the government will give, can apply at their school for a bursary or scholarship. Some extra assistance is available to students who are enrolled in certain areas of study, such as teaching.

Other scholarships reward high marks. The college will be able to give full details about the scholarships and other student finance options they offer. The amounts of school-level grants and bursaries in 2007/2008 ranged from approximately £300 and £3,000 a year.

Extra student finance is available to students with disabilities, or learning difficulties. Additionally, students with dependant children can have access to the Childcare grant or Parent’s Learning Allowance. Those with adult dependants can apply for an Adult Dependants’ Grant.Student finance is a must-have for hundreds of thousands of students in the UK.

Luckily, between loans, scholarships, grants and bursaries, there are plenty of student finance options available for students who need a little assistance to pay for their education.


Student Finance Wales, student finance contact.#Student #finance #contact


student finance contact

Student finance contact

Thinking about applying for a full-time or part-time undergraduate course for academic year 2018/19?

Find out what financial support may be available to you.

Student finance contact

Parents – watch our new film series now!

Our experts are here to tell you everything you need to know about student finance for 2018/19.

Student finance contact

Starting a postgraduate Master’s course in academic year 2017/18?

Apply for a Postgraduate Loan now!

Thinking about applying for a full-time or part-time undergraduate course for academic year 2018/19?

Find out what financial support may be available to you.

Parents – watch our new film series now!

Our experts are here to tell you everything you need to know about student finance for 2018/19.

Starting a postgraduate Master’s course in academic year 2017/18?

Apply for a Postgraduate Loan now!

Stay safe online

Watch our ‘Phishing’ video to find out more.

Welcome to the Student Finance Wales website

Student finance contact

Welcome. We hope you find the site informative and easy to use, you can also check out our Facebook and Twitter pages. For regular updates like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and watch our films on YouTube.

Student finance contact

Online declaration

If you applied online, you must sign and return the online declaration we sent you. You won’t be paid any grants or loans until we’ve received your signed declaration and you’ve registered at university or college.

Student finance contact

Questions about repayment?

Visit our repayment quick start guide for everything you need to know about how and when to repay your loan, how much you’ll repay and what interest is applied.

Getting paid

Before the start of term you’ll want to make sure that you get your money on time. Watch our video to find out more.

  • Postgraduate Loan for Master’s degrees
  • 2017/18 – what student finance is available for new full-time students
  • 2017/18 – what student finance is available for continuing full-time students?
  • 2017/18 – what student finance is available for new part-time students?
  • 2017/18 – what student finance is available for continuing part-time students?
  • Grant and Loan Overpayments
  • The maximum tuition fee in Wales in 2018/19 will remain at 9,000– 19/10/2017
  • Get your payment on time! What you need to know– 07/09/2017
  • Going through Clearing? Sort out your student finance– 17/08/2017
  • Part-time students – it’s time to apply for student finance!– 10/07/2017

Student finance contact

Postgraduate students

Learn more about Postgraduate Loan

Read more Student finance contact

At school or college?

Learn about EMA or WGLG further education financial support

Visit site Student finance contact

Contact us

Looking for more information? Contact our customer service team


EU Nationals and Student Finance in England (1) – Student Loans Company, student finance uk.#Student #finance #uk


EU Nationals and Student Finance in England

Statement from Jo Johnson, Minister of State for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation

The following statement applies to EU students who currently receive student loans and/or grants from Student Finance England (SFE), and to EU nationals applying to study in the UK in the 2016-17, 2017-18 or 2018-19 Academic Years.

Current students and those applying to start study in the remainder of the 16/17 Academic Year

As set out in a previous statement dated June 2016, EU nationals or their family members, currently in higher or further education, and who are eligible to receive loans and/or grants from SFE will continue to remain eligible for these loans and grants until they finish their course. This applies to all student finance provided to eligible EU students by SFE. This includes loans to cover tuition fees (for those resident in the EEA for at least three years), loans and grants for maintenance (for those resident in the UK for at least three years if they started a course before 1 st August 2016, and at least five years if they started or will start a course after 1 st August 2016, or who are EEA migrant workers), and some other grants and allowances. These students are also entitled to home fee status. This also applies to students who have not yet started their course, but who will do so before the end of the 16/17 Academic Year.

Students beginning study in the 2017/18 and 2018/19 Academic Years

As for students studying in the 16/17 Academic Year, the eligibility rules regarding student support and home fee status applying to EU nationals, or their family members, who wish to enter the UK to study a course in England which starts in either the 2017/18 or the 2018/19 Academic Year and which attracts student support, are also unchanged. SFE will assess these applications against existing eligibility criteria, and will provide loans and/or grants in the normal way. EU nationals, or their family members, who are assessed as eligible to receive grants and/or loans by SFE will then be eligible for this support and for home fee status for the duration of their course. These eligibility criteria set out that for students beginning study any time after August 2016, EU nationals must have been resident in the UK for at least five years or be EEA migrant workers in order to apply for a maintenance loan.

The migration status of EU nationals in the UK is being discussed as part of wider discussions with the EU. The Prime Minister was clear in her letter to the President of the European Council that that we should seek an early agreement on the rights of UK nationals in the EU and EU nationals in the UK, on a reciprocal basis.


Student Loans – Types, Eligibility, and More, The Art of Manliness, student finance direct.#Student #finance #direct


What Every Young Man Should Know About Student Loans

Student finance direct

Back-to-school time is once again right around the corner. Millions of recent high school graduates will be heading off to colleges and universities to fill their minds with knowledge and their bellies with ramen. New students are thinking about a lot of things what friends they’ll make, what classes they’ll take, and what it’ll be like being away from home for the first time.

What they’re probably not thinking about, unfortunately, are the loans they’ve likely taken out to pay for the education and experience that awaits them. This aversion is understandable the world of student loans is confusing, overwhelming, and seems disconnected from the present. It’s something you can worry about in 4-6 years, right?

Wrong. Taking the time right now to understand how student loans work will save you money and headaches down the road. So if you’re a young gent (or the parent of one) who’s heading off to college this year or next, we offer this accessible primer on the basics you should know about student loans.

If this info comes too late for you, as you’ve already graduated and are struggling with your student debt, later this week we’ll offer tips for paying it down.

Reduce the Amount You Need to Borrow

Before you consider taking out student loans, it’s financially prudent to find as many ways as possible to reduce the amount you need to borrow in the first place. The less debt you take on now, the less you have to pay back after college. It’s hard to overestimate how much you’ll appreciate even a small reduction in your total debt later on, but trust me, someday you will.

Know that about 2/3 of all college students graduate with student debt, and the average debt is about $30,000. It’s hard for a young man to put that into perspective, but when you’re repaying that loan, the average bill per month is about $320. When combined with other bills and debts, and especially when you get married, it will be a large chunk of your monthly budget. In fact, only about 60% of all student loans are being actively repaid at any given time; this means that just under half of all borrowers can’t afford that monthly payment (and failing to pay has dire consequences which we ll discuss next time). These are just numbers, of course, but are sobering nonetheless, and hopefully give some credence to the reality of student loans and the necessity of reducing them as much as you can.

Save for college. Sure, you’re probably not going to be able to save enough money from your high school job to pay for the entirety of your college education, but every little bit helps. So get out there and get a job. Use some of that money for fun, but be sure to set aside a chunk for school.

If you’re a parent with young children, start thinking ahead by opening up a 529 account with your state to save money for your kid’s future education. Contribute a little bit each month. The money you contribute is taxable, but it grows interest-free. Also consider asking family members to contribute as Christmas and birthday gifts, especially early on when Junior won’t know the difference anyway.

Apply for scholarships. I wish I sought out more scholarships when I was applying for my undergraduate degree. I think I applied for like five, and I ended up getting one for a few hundred dollars. But I had only scratched the surface there are literally thousands of opportunities out there. Don’t just apply for the scholarships that your school offers a lot of organizations have scholarship funds available, and in many cases that money doesn’t even get dispersed because no one ever applies for it. Thanks to the internet, hunting for scholarships is a breeze. Search these sites for scholarship opportunities:

Once you put together a big list of scholarships, dedicate a few hours each weekend to submitting the applications. Sure, it’s tedious and boring, but if you can score a few thousand dollars to go towards your tuition, it’s completely worth it.

“Moneyball” your way through college. Last year AoM guest contributor Jay Cross published an article on how to use CLEP exams to reduce the amount you pay in college tuition. The tests cost just $80 each, but if you pass, you don’t have to take that class in college, saving yourself hundreds or thousands of dollars.

Coupling CLEP exams with taking AP classes (and passing the exam) in high school is another effective way to save big-time money and months of your time. Using a combination of AP exam credit and CLEP exams, I was able to shave off a whole year of college. It was awesome!

Go to a community college the first two years. If you can’t CLEP out of some of your general ed requirements, consider attending a local community college for the first two years of your schooling. Sure, you’re not getting the “full college experience,” but you’ll save a lot of money.

Live at home. My first semester of college I lived in the dorms at OU. It was a blast, but my grades suffered, and it cost me several thousand dollars. At the end of the semester, I decided to transfer to a college in my hometown and move back in with my folks. The tuition was much cheaper, plus I saved a ton of money on living expenses. And as a bonus, I had a 4.0 my second semester.

If it’s an option, consider living with your folks while you’re in college. Sure, they’ll cramp your style some, but you’ll be amazed at how much money you’ll save and how much more productive you’ll be.

Don’t take the full amount of student loans offered you. Before school starts, you’ll get a letter telling you how much in student loans you’ve been approved for. You don’t have to accept the full amount. Take a look at your whole financial situation and decide how much you need to make it through the college year. Many students take the full amount and use what’s left over after tuition and books as spending money. But if you work while you’re going to school, you won’t need to do that. Which brings me to my next point…

Work your way through college. Yes, school should be your top priority. But with efficient use of your time, you can make room for a part-time job. I waited tables and made smoothies throughout college. And most schools offer on-campus jobs that are pretty easy to get, and of course flexible with your class schedule.

Because I had money to pay for my living expenses, I didn’t have to take the full loan amount I was offered each semester. I typically just took enough to cover my tuition and books, and I saved thousands of dollars because of that.

Understand the Two Types of Student Loans

So you’ve done all you can to reduce the amount you need to borrow, but you still have to take on some loans.

Student loans will come in two broad categories: federal student loans and private loans. With federal student loans, the U.S. government is your lender. Thanks to various laws, money lent by the government comes with provisions to help you manage your student debt, such as fixed, relatively low-interest rates, grace periods, and flexible repayment plans.

With private loans, a bank or some other institution is your lender. The company you borrow the money from sets the rules on repayment and they’re not as generous as Uncle Sam.

To help you navigate the various types of student loans out there, we’ve created this handy-dandy chart:

Determining Your Eligibility for Federal Student Loans

To be eligible for any federal student loan, you must meet a few baseline requirements. Most are what you’d expect: graduate high school, be enrolled or accepted to an accredited college, have a valid Social Security Card.

The one eligibility requirement that I didn’t know about and that is unique to men is that you have to be registered with the Selective Service if you’re between the ages of 18 and 25. Uncle Sam won’t give you any loans unless you’re willing to be drafted into World War III.

If you meet the above requirements, then you just need to fill out and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You can submit applications for the fall semester after January 1. The earlier you submit your FAFSA application, the better. It takes awhile to fill out, so look to set aside about an hour if you’re a first-time applicant.

When Do You Have to Start Paying Back Your Student Loans?

With both federal subsidized and unsubsidized student loans, you’re a given a six-month grace period before you’re required to start paying back your loan. The grace period starts after you gradate, leave school, or drop below half-time enrollment. Just remember, with unsubsidized student loans, you’ll be accruing interest during your grace period and the interest will be added to your total principal. With subsidized loans, the grace period is interest-free.

When it comes to student loans, a little knowledge goes a long way. Do what you can to reduce the amount you borrow, understand the nature of the loans you’re taking, and start thinking now about how you’ll pay them back after you get your sheepskin.

If you’ve already graduated and are having trouble making your loan payment, on Thursday we’ll offer you some tips on paying back that debt.


Student Finance Wales, student finance direct.#Student #finance #direct


student finance direct

Student finance direct

Thinking about applying for a full-time or part-time undergraduate course for academic year 2018/19?

Find out what financial support may be available to you.

Student finance direct

Parents – watch our new film series now!

Our experts are here to tell you everything you need to know about student finance for 2018/19.

Student finance direct

Starting a postgraduate Master’s course in academic year 2017/18?

Apply for a Postgraduate Loan now!

Thinking about applying for a full-time or part-time undergraduate course for academic year 2018/19?

Find out what financial support may be available to you.

Parents – watch our new film series now!

Our experts are here to tell you everything you need to know about student finance for 2018/19.

Starting a postgraduate Master’s course in academic year 2017/18?

Apply for a Postgraduate Loan now!

Stay safe online

Watch our ‘Phishing’ video to find out more.

Welcome to the Student Finance Wales website

Student finance direct

Welcome. We hope you find the site informative and easy to use, you can also check out our Facebook and Twitter pages. For regular updates like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and watch our films on YouTube.

Student finance direct

Online declaration

If you applied online, you must sign and return the online declaration we sent you. You won’t be paid any grants or loans until we’ve received your signed declaration and you’ve registered at university or college.

Student finance direct

Questions about repayment?

Visit our repayment quick start guide for everything you need to know about how and when to repay your loan, how much you’ll repay and what interest is applied.

Getting paid

Before the start of term you’ll want to make sure that you get your money on time. Watch our video to find out more.

  • Postgraduate Loan for Master’s degrees
  • 2017/18 – what student finance is available for new full-time students
  • 2017/18 – what student finance is available for continuing full-time students?
  • 2017/18 – what student finance is available for new part-time students?
  • 2017/18 – what student finance is available for continuing part-time students?
  • Grant and Loan Overpayments
  • The maximum tuition fee in Wales in 2018/19 will remain at 9,000– 19/10/2017
  • Get your payment on time! What you need to know– 07/09/2017
  • Going through Clearing? Sort out your student finance– 17/08/2017
  • Part-time students – it’s time to apply for student finance!– 10/07/2017

Student finance direct

Postgraduate students

Learn more about Postgraduate Loan

Read more Student finance direct

At school or college?

Learn about EMA or WGLG further education financial support

Visit site Student finance direct

Contact us

Looking for more information? Contact our customer service team


Student Finance Refund Requests – Student Finance – Lansing Community College, student finance direct.#Student #finance #direct


student finance direct

Student finance direct

Welcome to Student Finance

Student Refund and Payment Plan Services Moving to TouchNet

Beginning July 1, 2016, Lansing Community College will change vendors supporting student refund and payment plan services to TouchNet. Students will now receive enhanced integrated services including direct deposit of student refunds and real-time payment plans. ALL STUDENTS will be required to sign into their Self Service Page and re-select their preference for how their refunds are received. Students may keep their BankMobile accounts, but these will become a traditional ACH transaction rather than the direct deposit account as it currently operates.

Select your Refund Preference with TouchNet. Follow These user guides for assistance.

Two TouchNet ATM s using the Discover network are at the following locations:

  • West Campus – To the right of the Service Center
  • Downtown Campus, Gannon Building – Outside the Student Commons located near the vending machines

As the new ATM s are part of the All Point ATM Network, students choosing to continue to use their BankMobile account to receive their refunds and use their Debit Cards will not incur a foreign ATM service charge.

Questions?

Please contact the Student Finance Office at 483-1272 Option 3 or [email protected]

Spring 2018 Semester Important Dates

Student finance direct

Oct 2: Spring Semester Registration Begins

Dec 14: Book Voucher Begins

Dec 15: Supply Advance Refunds Begin

Dec 24, 2017 – Jan 1, 2018 – Holiday Break (college closed)

Jan 8: Spring Semester Begins

Jan 15: Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday (college closed)

Jan 29: Federal Pell Grant Census Date (more)

Jan 31: Grants, Scholarships, 1st Half Loan Refunds Begin *

Feb 9: Freshman First-Time Loan Borrower Refunds Begin *

Mar 5 – 11: Spring Break (no classes)

Mar 23: 2nd Half Loan Refunds Begin *

May 7: Spring Semester Ends

May 10: LCC Commencement

* This is the earliest your refund will be available in your account. Login to view your specific disbursement dates.

Fall 2017 Semester Important Dates

Student finance direct

April 12: Fall Registration Begins

July 5: Fall Bills Available in Self Service Banner

Aug 8: Supply Advance and Book Voucher Begins (allow 2-3 business days for advance)

Aug 24: Fall Semester Begins

Sep 4: Labor Day (college closed)

Sep 11: Federal Pell Grant Census Date ( more )

Sep 13: Grants, Scholarships, 1st Half Loan Refunds Begin *

Sep 27: Freshman First-Time Loan Borrower Refunds Begin *

Oct 30: 2nd Half Loan Refunds Begin *

Nov 23 – 26: Thanksgiving Holiday (college closed)

Dec 24, 2017 – Jan 1, 2018 – Holiday Break (college closed)

* This is the earliest your refund will be available in your account. Login to view your specific disbursement dates.

Tuition Rates Fees

Tuition rates vary depending on a specific course, a student s residency status, or a senior citizen status. Both tuition rates and fees and are determined by the LCC Board of Trustees. Please visit Tuition Fees to view the current rates and more information on how your tuition is assessed.

Payment Information

Tuition and fee payments may be made in full, or set up in increments through an installment payment plan. Students may enroll in one of multiple payment plan options through their Self Service Account using the TouchNet Student Account Center.

Students not paying tuition and fees in full, who receive financial aid, or receive assistance through a third party will need to establish a Deferred Payment Plan. Those receiving assistance through a Third Party (not financial aid) will need to submit an authorization form to the Student Finance Office. See the Payments page to find which payment date affects you.

Student eRefunds PLUS

All LCC refunds are issued electronically via ACH, for students age 18 and over. Students can choose their refund preference. Please visit our Refunds page for more information.

Student finance direct

2nd Floor – StarZone

Phone: (517) 483-1272 option 3

Monday – Thursday: 8am – 6pm

Friday: 8am – 4pm

Student finance direct Student finance direct Student finance direct Student finance direct


Student loans mythbusting: The truth about uni fees, loans & grants, student finance direct.#Student #finance #direct


Student Loans Mythbusting

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Student finance direct

Updated October 2017

Student finance direct Ignore newspaper headlines about students leaving university with Ј50,000 of debt. That’s a mostly meaningless figure. What counts is how much you’ll repay; for some that’s far more, for others it’s free.

This guide is written to bust common myths about student loans, grants and finance, including the 20+ key facts every potential student, parent and grandparent should know.

20+ student loans mythbusting tips, including.

Student finance direct

Recently graduated and worried about the interest?

Read Martin’s “Student loan interest’s rising to 6.1% – should you panic or pay it off?” guide

Before we start, I’d just like to say:

For 23 years we educated our youth into debt when they go to university, but never about debt.

It was for this reason, and while no fan of them, when massive changes were announced to student finance for those starting in 2012 or beyond – including the trebling of tuition fees – I agreed to head up a student finance taskforce. The idea was to work with the National Union of Students, universities and colleges to ensure we busted the myths and misunderstandings that resulted from so much political spittle-flying.

Don’t confuse the cost and the price tag

Student finance directWith headlines shouting about Ј50,000 student debt and that getting bigger as living loans increase in 2017, it’s safe to say many students and parents are scared by this huge sum – and worry about how they’ll ever repay it.

But in essence that fear is misplaced. That’s because the price tag of university is mostly irrelevant. What matters in practical terms is how much you have to repay – and that’s a completely separate number from the total amount of tuition fees, maintenance loan and interest, because it all depends on what you would pay.

What you repay solely depends on what you earn after university. In effect this is, financially at least, a ‘no win, no fee’ education. Those who earn a lot after graduating or leaving university will repay a lot. Those who don’t gain too much financially from going to university will repay little or nothing.

This guide applies to the system started in England Wales in 2012

If you started before that you’re on a different system; please see the Should I repay my student loan? guide for full info on past loan systems.

You don’t need the cash to pay for university

It ISN’T a case of ‘pay up or you can’t go’. Once your application has been processed, tuition fees are automatically paid by the Student Loans Company. And there is a loan for living costs too.

Of course you don’t have to take these loans, you could pay the tuition fees directly. Yet as you’ll see (in point 15) that’s often a bad idea.

However, some students won’t get the same support as the majority.

If you already have a higher education qualification

If you already have a higher education qualification you’re unlikely to be able to borrow the money. Included within undergraduate courses are Higher National Diploma/Certificate courses and certain teacher training courses such as the PGCE.

If you’re wanting to study health care or medicine?

The Chancellor announced an overhaul to the existing grants system for student nurses in his Autumn Statement in November 2015.

From academic year 2017/18, student nurses will no longer receive grants and will instead apply for student loans, which the Government says means they’ll get more to live on than they’d get through the grants system.

The amount students will get depends on whether they live inside or outside London and whether they are living at home.

Taking into account a long-course allowance, the maximum a student would get living outside London and not at home is Ј10,092.

Nurses who have already started their studies will continue to get grants and nursing students who’d already applied for grants for the 2016/17 academic year would also have received these.

When nurses leave their studies and start to repay their loans, it will be under the normal loan repayment system described in this guide, meaning they will repay 9% of everything they earn above Ј21,000. The starting salary for a nurse is Ј21,600, so in the first year they will pay about Ј54 towards their student loan.

How the system currently works

Medical and health care students get support from the NHS bursary scheme, where they’ll also get an additional NHS grant and maintenance loan from Student Finance England. The amounts and rules are different depending on the course.

Undergraduate medical or dental students on five/six-year courses will have all tuition fees paid in their fifth and final years. Those on four-year courses must contribute Ј3,465 to their first-year fees, then receive Ј3,465 in years two, three and four as a bursary. Both will then be able to apply for a student loan for the remainder of their fees (eg, undergrad med student can apply for a loan for one to four years).

Graduates on the four-year accelerated medicine programme will have to fund the Ј3,465 tuition fee for all the years themselves. Eligible students can apply for a loan up to Ј5,535 to cover the remaining tuition fees.

You must reapply every year for the NHS bursary, and applications have to be received within six months of the first day of the academic year.

Fees for suitable non-medical courses, eg, physiotherapy, nursing and midwifery, are usually paid directly by the NHS so eligible students will not be required to pay tuition fees.

They will also be eligible for a Ј1,000 grant, means-tested bursary up to Ј4,395 (Ј5,460 in London, Ј3,351 if living at home, less for courses under 30 weeks each academic year) and a non-means-tested maintenance loan of up to Ј2,324 (Ј3,263 London, Ј1,744 home; all are reduced in final year of study).

If you’re a Muslim student

Muslim students in England are set to be able to get alternative student finance acceptable under Sharia, although there is no news on when this will be made available. We’ll update the guide as soon as we know more.


EU Nationals and Student Finance in England – Student Loans Company, student finance direct.#Student #finance #direct


EU Nationals and Student Finance in England

Statement by Jo Johnson, Minister of State for Universities and Science

11 October 2016

The following statement applies to EU nationals who are currently in receipt of student loans from the Student Finance England (SFE), and to EU nationals who intend to begin studying from this autumn, and to EU nationals applying to study from autumn 2017.

EU nationals or their family members, currently in higher or further education, and who are eligible to receive loans and/or grants from SFE will continue to receive these loans and grants until they finish their course. This applies to all student finance provided to eligible EU students by SFE. This includes loans to cover tuition fees (for those resident in the EEA for at least three years), loans and grants for maintenance (for those resident in the UK for at least three years or who are EEA migrant workers), and some other grants and allowances. These students are also entitled to home fee status.

Students beginning study in the 2016/17 Academic Year

The rules applying to EU nationals, or their family members, who have applied to study a course which started or starts in the 2016/17 Academic Year and which attracts student support, are unchanged. The SFE will assess these applications against existing eligibility criteria, and will provide loans and/or grants in the normal way. EU nationals, or their family members, who are assessed as eligible to receive grants and/or loans from the SFE in the 2016/17 Academic Year will be eligible for this support and for home fee status for the duration of their study. The eligibility criteria set out that for students beginning study from August 2016, EU nationals must have been resident in the UK for at least five years or be EEA migrant workers in order to apply for a maintenance loan.

Students beginning study in the 2017/18 Academic Year

The rules applying to EU nationals, or their family members, who are applying to study a course which starts in the 2017/18 Academic Year and which attracts student support, are also unchanged. The SFE will assess these applications against existing eligibility criteria, and will provide loans and/or grants in the normal way. EU nationals, or their family members, who are assessed as eligible to receive grants and/or loans by the SFE in the 2017/18 Academic Year will be eligible for this support and for home fee status for the duration of their study. These eligibility criteria set out that for students beginning study from August 2017, EU nationals must have been resident in the UK for at least five years or be EEA migrant workers in order to apply for a maintenance loan.


Student Finance, A guide to student finance, student finance contact.#Student #finance #contact


Student Finance

The cost of a college education is getting higher. Parents aren’t always able to fully fund their child’s education, so many students are looking for other options.

Luckily, student finance is available to help offset college expenses. There are many types of student finance. Availability is based on each individual student’s financial situation, mental and physical well-being, course load, and area of study.

Full-time students can receive student finance from the government. This student finance can come in the form of loans, which must be repaid after graduation, or grants, which do not require repayment.

What is student finance

Student finance can be used to cover the cost of tuition (loans for fees) or the cost of living (loans for maintenance). Additionally, student finance options can be combined. Some students take out loans to pay for expenses that their grants don’t cover.

Interest accrues on student finance from the date students receive them to the date they finish repaying them. The interest rate is linked to the rate of inflation, so the amount of student finance repaid is the same in real terms as the amount borrowed. Student loans can be obtained through the government or through private commercial lenders.

In addition to government assistance, student finance is also available from colleges. Students who don’t qualify for other types of student finance, or who need more help than the government will give, can apply at their school for a bursary or scholarship. Some extra assistance is available to students who are enrolled in certain areas of study, such as teaching.

Other scholarships reward high marks. The college will be able to give full details about the scholarships and other student finance options they offer. The amounts of school-level grants and bursaries in 2007/2008 ranged from approximately £300 and £3,000 a year.

Extra student finance is available to students with disabilities, or learning difficulties. Additionally, students with dependant children can have access to the Childcare grant or Parent’s Learning Allowance. Those with adult dependants can apply for an Adult Dependants’ Grant.Student finance is a must-have for hundreds of thousands of students in the UK.

Luckily, between loans, scholarships, grants and bursaries, there are plenty of student finance options available for students who need a little assistance to pay for their education.


Contact Student Finance England, student finance contact.#Student #finance #contact


Contact Student Finance England

Contact details for Student Finance England including complaints, appeals, the Student Finance Services Non UK Team and the Advanced Learner Loan.

Parents and partners need the student’s consent before Student Finance England can give them information – the student can give consent when they apply or at a later date.

These addresses are post collection points only – not offices.

Telephone: 0300 100 0607

Monday to Friday, 8am to 8pm

Saturday and Sunday, 9am to 4pm

Textphone: 0300 100 0622

Monday to Friday, 8am to 4pm

Student Finance England

Darlington DL1 9HJ

EU students

Student Finance Services Non UK Team

Telephone: 0141 243 3570

From outside the UK: +44 (0)141 243 3570

Monday to Friday, 9am to 5:30pm

Student Finance Services Non UK Team

Student Finance England

Darlington DL1 9AZ

EEA citizens working in the UK

Telephone: 0300 100 0607

Monday to Friday, 8am to 8pm

Saturday, 9am to 4pm

Textphone: 0300 100 0622

Monday to Friday, 8am to 4pm

European Economic Area (EEA) Migrant Worker Applications

Student Finance England

Darlington DL1 9AZ

Postgraduate Loan

Telephone: 0300 100 0031

Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm

Student Finance England

Darlington DL1 9HJ

Advanced Learner Loan

Telephone: 0300 100 0619

Monday to Friday, 8am to 8pm

Saturday, 9am to 4pm

Advanced Learner Loan

Darlington DL1 9NQ

Complaints

Contact the Student Loans Company if you have a complaint.

Telephone: 0300 100 0601

Appeals

An appeal is a formal request to Student Finance England asking them to review a decision about whether you can get financial help and if so how much.

Read the guidance and complete the application form.

Send the completed form by email or post to Student Finance England.