Business News & Financial News, Reuters, what is finance.#What #is #finance


Business

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German growth surprise lifts Europe as China subdues Asia

What is finance

Home Depot profit beats as hurricanes spur demand

What is finance

SoftBank says considering investment in Uber but no final agreement reached

What is finance

Shrinking GE rattles investors, shares hit 5-year low

What is finance

China’s foreign ownership cap change may stir interest in smaller banks: Fitch

Fed chief says policy guidance beneficial but must be conditional

Silicon Valley blasts Senate proposal to tax startup options

GE says plans new wind farms in Finland, Sweden

Tesco wins UK regulator’s provisional approval for Booker takeover

Kuwait airline in draft deal for 25 Airbus A320neo jets

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Softbank weighs up $10 bln investment in Uber

GE’s turnaround plan met with investor slap down

GE to focus on 3 businesses

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Reuters is the news and media division of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

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Business News & Financial News, Reuters, what is finance.#What #is #finance


Business

What is finance

German growth surprise lifts Europe as China subdues Asia

What is finance

Home Depot profit beats as hurricanes spur demand

What is finance

SoftBank says considering investment in Uber but no final agreement reached

What is finance

Shrinking GE rattles investors, shares hit 5-year low

What is finance

China’s foreign ownership cap change may stir interest in smaller banks: Fitch

Fed chief says policy guidance beneficial but must be conditional

Silicon Valley blasts Senate proposal to tax startup options

GE says plans new wind farms in Finland, Sweden

Tesco wins UK regulator’s provisional approval for Booker takeover

Kuwait airline in draft deal for 25 Airbus A320neo jets

Business Video

Softbank weighs up $10 bln investment in Uber

GE’s turnaround plan met with investor slap down

GE to focus on 3 businesses

MORE BUSINESS NEWS

SPONSORED STORIES

Reuters is the news and media division of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms.

*All quotes delayed a minimum of 15 minutes. See here for a complete list of exchanges and delays.


Department of Finance, what is finance.#What #is #finance


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What is finance

An independent review of the PGPA Act and the accompanying Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule) is currently underway, in accordance with section 112 of the Act. The review is being undertaken by Mr David Thodey AO and Ms Elizabeth Alexander AM.

  • New Travel Accommodation Arrangement

    The Department of Finance, on behalf of the Commonwealth, has reappointed AOT Hotels Ltd as the sole provider of accommodation program management services for the next three years, with options to extend for a further three years.

  • New Stationery and Office Supplies Panel

    The Department of Finance, on behalf of the Commonwealth, has appointed a new Stationery and Office Supplies Panel to provide savings through competitive pricing and conditions.

  • GrantConnect, the Commonwealth Government’s whole-of-government grant information system is now live.
  • Amended Commonwealth Procurement Rules to commence 1 March 2017
  • New Major Office Machines PanelWhat is finance
  • The Department of Finance, on behalf of the Commonwealth, has appointed a new Major Office Machines (MOMs) panel to provide more competitive purchase, lease and maintenance costs. Also see the MOMs webpage.
  • New Government Air Travel Services PanelWhat is finance

    The Department of Finance on behalf of the Commonwealth, has established a new panel to provide international and domestic air travel for the Australian Government.

  • 2016 Australian Government ICT Awards – Nominations now open

    Nominations are open now and will close 11.00 pm (AESDT) on Monday 29 February 2016. The Awards will be presented at the CeBIT Gala Dinner and Awards in Sydney on Tuesday 3 May 2016.

  • Discussion Paper – Shared and Common Services ProgrammeWhat is finance

    The Discussion Paper seeks the views of interested parties on the most effective and efficient way to consolidate shared and common service delivery in a manner that represents value for money to Government.

  • Latest Publications

    What is finance

    The Government tabled its response to the Committee’s Report on Tuesday 14 November 2017.

  • Australian Government Monthly Financial Statements September 2017 (27/10/2017)

    The underlying cash balance for the 2017-18 financial year to 30 September 2017 was a deficit of $17,285 million.

  • Department of Finance Annual Report 2016—17 (20/10/2017)

    The Department of Finance Annual Report 2016—17 has been released in both web and PDF formats.

  • Australian Government Monthly Financial Statements July and August 2017 (13/10/2017)

    The underlying cash balance for the 2017-18 financial year to 31 August 2017 was a deficit of $8,784 million.

  • Department of Finance Corporate Plan 2017-18 (31/08/2017)

    The Flipchart sets out the information Finance has on the status of Commonwealth entities and companies at a particular date.

  • Australian Government Monthly Financial Statements May 2017 (30/06/2017)

    The underlying cash balance for the 2016-17 financial year to 31 May 2017 was a deficit of $30,427 million.

  • Parliamentarians’ Reporting (22/06/2017)

    – Parliamentarians’ Expenditure – Period 1 July to 31 December 2016

    – Former Parliamentarians’ Expenditure – Period 1 July to 31 December 2016

    – Parliamentarians’ Certification Details – Period 1 July to 31 December 2016

    – Former Parliamentarians’ Certification Details – Period 1 July to 31 December 2016

    – Office Costs – Period 1 July to 31 December 2016

    The underlying cash balance for the 2016-17 financial year to 30 April 2017 was a deficit of $36,078 million.

  • Australian Government Monthly Financial Statements March 2017 (5/05/2017)

    The underlying cash balance for the 2016-17 financial year to 31 March 2017 was a deficit of $38,907 million.

  • Australian Government Monthly Financial Statements February 2017 (31/03/2017)

    The Finance Minister’s report on AFMs issued in 2015-16 was tabled in Parliament.

  • 2017-18 Portfolio Budget Statements guidance (16/03/2017)

    The underlying cash balance for the 2016-17 financial year to 31 January 2017 was a deficit of $44,029 million.

  • Senate Order 12 – Production of Departmental File Lists (14/02/2017)

    The underlying cash balance for the 2016-17 financial year to 31 December 2016 was a deficit of $33,025 million.

  • RMG 200 – Guide to the PGPA Act for accountable authorities(AAs)

    The guide to the PGPA Act for accountable authorities is now available. This guide provides a summary of responsibilities for AAs under the PGPA Act.

  • Commonwealth Consolidated Financial Statement 2015-2016

    The underlying cash balance for the 2015-16 financial year was a deficit of $43,583 million.

  • RMG 206 – Model accountable authority instructions (AAIs)

    Updated Model accountable authority instructions (AAIs) for corporate Commonwealth entities (CCEs) are now available. The Model AAIs have been streamlined and improved.

  • Australian Government ICT Trends Report 2015-16
  • 2016-17 Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements (14/12/2016)

    The 2016-17 Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements guidance was issued on 13 December 2016.

    • Australian Government Monthly Financial Statements October 2016 (25/10/2016)

      The underlying cash balance for the 2016-17 financial year to 31 October 2016 was a deficit of $24,548 million.


    What is factoring? #personal #finance #advice


    #factoring finance

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    What is factoring?

    Factoring . receivables factoring or debtor financing, is when a company buys a debt or invoice from another company. Factoring is also seen as a form of invoice discounting in many markets and is very similar but just within a different context. In this purchase, accounts receivable are discounted in order to allow the buyer to make a profit upon the settlement of the debt. Essentially factoring transfers the ownership of accounts to another party that then chases up the debt.

    Factoring therefore relieves the first party of a debt for less than the total amount providing them with working capital to continue trading, while the buyer, or factor, chases up the debt for the full amount and profits when it is paid. The factor is required to pay additional fees, typically a small percentage, once the debt has been settled. The factor may also offer a discount to the indebted party.

    Factoring is a very common method used by exporters to help accelerate their cash flow. The process enables the exporter to draw up to 80% of the sales invoice s value at the point of delivery of the goods and when the sales invoice is raised.

    Forfaiting (note the spelling) is the purchase of an exporter’s receivables the amount that the importer owes the exporter at a discount by paying cash. The purchaser of the receivables, or forfaiter . must now be paid by the importer to settle the debt. This is a common process used for speeding up the cash flow cycle and providing risk mitigation for the exporter on 100% of the debts value.

    As the receivables are usually guaranteed by the importer’s bank, the forfaiter frees the exporter from the risk of non-payment by the importer . When a forfaiter purchases the exporter s receivables directly from the exporter then it is referred to as a primary purchase. The receivables technically then become a form of debt instrument that can be sold on the secondary market as bills of exchange or promissory notes . this is known as a secondary purchase.

    What is.

    To help go into further detail of what trade finance is, we have split the definition up into the key sectors of the trade finance industry and the ones that we strive to cover. Please click on one of the buttons below.

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    What information on futures does CNN Money provide? #ford #finance


    #cnn finance

    #

    What information on futures does CNN Money provide?

    Quick Answer

    The cable channel’s Money web page on pre-market trading provides an estimate of the Dow Jones, NASDAQ and S
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    What are the benefits of campaign finance reform? The Washington Post #short #term #finance


    #campaign finance reform

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    What are the benefits of campaign finance reform?

    By Sam Power November 17, 2015

    Recently, Ray LaRaja and Brian Schaffener made a fascinating contribution to this blog outlining recent developments in party funding research. They essentially asked three questions:

    • Whether party funding reform can help tone down political polarization.
    • If states were to increase their funding of political parties, how it should be done.
    • How we can design a system that can allay public fears of corruption.

    Such questions keep party funding reformers up at night. I cannot necessarily provide solutions. But there might be some useful information in lessons learned from research on Europe, and more specifically, Great Britain.

    The overwhelming trend among European nations is to increase state funding for political parties, as you can see in the timeline below, with source data from van Biezen and Kopecký .

    Britain and the U.S. are the exceptions in the developed world. The government does not pick up much of the bill. Academics explain that British exceptionalism as the result of British citizens persistently preferring volunteerism over statism. A system of membership and donations is preferred to state funding — despite the many times in which Britons perceive corruption within this model.

    A system in which party membership and small individual donations make up most of a political party’s annual budget is undoubtedly preferable to one in which parties are propped up by the government. It is, however – especially considering the Europe-wide downturn in party membership – a utopian vision.

    But does national funding for parties reduce polarization?

    LaRaja and Schaffener remain unconvinced. Other studies tend to corroborate this skepticism.

    One scholar, Andrew B. Hall. studied five state legislatures and found that public funding for parties actually increased polarization. In these systems, small donations are matched with state funds. Small donations tend to come from party members, who, in turn, tend to be more extreme than the party elite – and, what’s more important, more extreme than the pool of potential voters.

    We see this currently in Great Britain with the election of Jeremy Corbyn as the leader of the Labour party. He is widely supported by grass-roots membership, less so by the parliamentary party .

    Polarization and state finance has also been studied elsewhere in Western Europe. Munich-based political scientist Michael Koβ shows that reform tends to happen when politics is more collegial. Again we can look to Britain to see why this might be.

    Polling consistently shows that the public believes large donations can buy political favors. However, the proposed solution – a cap on donations, offset with the introduction of increased funding by the state – remains publicly unpopular. Politicians have a better chance of surviving the damage at the polling booth if both or all parties have backed the reforms.

    But if the logic behind reform is to strengthen democracy, that might be contradicted by having (1) parties colluding to (2) introduce an unpopular reform which (3) increases the amount of funding they receive (4) from the taxpayer. In fact, it might actually increase the anti-establishment and anti-political feeling that some believe these reforms should quell.

    But even if you reject that argument, Democrats and Republicans are widely considered to be especially ideologically opposed just now. If funding reform tends to take place when the political climate is congenial, now might not be the moment.

    So would state funding of political parties decrease corruption?

    There is little evidence that introducing significant state funding will reduce corruption, and more importantl, perceptions of corruption. Just because you have state funding doesn’t mean your country is, or is perceived to be, less corrupt.

    Take Denmark, which for the past three years has been at the top of the Transparency International (TI) Corruption Perceptions Index. Despite being a supposed beacon of integrity, Denmark has recently had its party finance legislation criticized by the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO) — particularly, its failures to meet the obligation to be transparent.

    Denmark has a robust system of state subsidy of party finances, with upwards of 75 percent of funding provided by public money. As the GRECO criticism shows, this does little to allay fears of corruption in the system or to improve the standing of the parties with the public.

    Another TI indicator, the Global Corruption Barometer, reported that 54 percent of the public believed that political parties were somewhat to entirely “run by a few big entities acting in their own best interests.”

    If reformers genuinely want to strengthen democracy, promising that public funding would deliver too much might disappoint, leaving citizens with still more anti-establishment and anti-political feelings.

    There are many reasons to enact reform. Certainly many people believe that politicians have better things to do with their time than begging for donations from a few rich backers. That does not mean, however, that the unique challenges reform presents should be ignored (a potential increase in political polarization being one).

    But those pushing for reform shouldn’t overpromise or expect too much. They should be considered within a wider package of reforms that address political disillusionment. If introduced as the attempt to reduce anti-democratic and anti-establishment feeling, or worse to reduce corruption in politics, they will disappoint.

    Sam Power is a doctoral researcher at the Sussex Centre for the Corruption, University of Sussex. His research is focuses on party funding regimes and corruption in Western Europe.

    What Twitter is talking about

    Since the beginning of August, tweets about immigration have made up about 18 percent of the Twitter conversation around core election issues. But tweets on the topic soared to almost 60 percent of the election-related Twitter conversation after Donald Trump’s statements about a potential “softening,” his visit to Mexico and then his address on the topic Wednesday night in Phoenix. This data comes from the Electome — a project of the Laboratory for Social Machines at the MIT Media Lab that’s been analyzing social media data about the election

    Immigration is dominating the election conversation on Twitter

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    How much Hillary and Bill Clinton have donated to charity between 2001 and 2015. In that 15-year period — the years since the Clintons left the White House — they earned about $237 million in adjusted gross income,much of it from speaking fees and book royalties. So Clinton and her husband donated about 9.8 percent of their adjusted gross income.

    How much The Post has been able to identify Trump as donating from his own pocket since 2001. According to tax records, the last donation shown from Trump to the Donald J. Trump Foundation was in 2008, for $30,000.

    What we know about the charitable giving by Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

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    The fall 2016 debate schedule

    Mon. September 26

    Presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

    Vice presidential debate between Sen. Tim Kaine and Gov. Mike Pence

    Presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

    Presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

    Megyn Kelly thinks she knows why Donald Trump wants to change the debate dates


    What Can You Do With a Bachelors in Finance? #swift #finance


    #bachelor of finance

    #

    What Can You Do With a Bachelors in Finance?

    A bachelor’s degree program in finance prepares graduates for many entry-level jobs, including financial planner, portfolio manager and financial analyst. Find out what other paths finance students can consider with a bachelor’s degree

    Opportunities for Graduates with a Bachelor’s Degree in Finance

    A bachelor’s degree in finance can open many doors for graduates, including access to entry-level positions in finance and business, certification as a finance professional and preparation for graduate programs. Undergraduate finance majors learn about various subjects, such as long-term financial planning, cost control and sound investing. Typical college courses include accounting, statistics, financial markets, international finance and financial statement analysis.

    Entry-Level Finance Positions

    While students have the option of pursuing either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in finance, both degree programs lead to the same entry-level positions. A Bachelor of Arts in Finance offers students a more broad, liberal arts approach to studying finance than a Bachelor of Science degree.

    Finance majors often find employment opportunities in such areas as banking, investments and financial services. Typical employers include securities and commodities brokers, banks, insurance carriers, government agencies and real estate companies. Some entry-level positions in finance include:

    • Bank branch manager
    • Commercial lender
    • Financial analyst
    • Financial manager
    • Financial planner
    • Portfolio manager
    • Security analyst
    • Trust manager

    Finance Certifications

    Although it may not necessarily be a requirement, many positions encourage applicants to seek certification. Working as a financial analyst, for example, may require a Chartered Financial Analyst designation. A bachelor’s degree in finance is required for most certifications, and several years of work experience may be needed prior to becoming certified. Certification programs include, but aren’t limited to, Certified Public Finance Officers, Certified Management Accountant and Certified Healthcare Financial Professional.

    Graduate Study

    Laying the foundation for graduate school is especially important, since many corporate employers prefer, or even require, applicants to hold a master’s degree in finance. Students continuing their studies at the graduate level qualify for advanced job opportunities. A finance background lends itself to other graduate studies, including public administration, law and business. Upper-level career options exist in:

    • Corporate finance
    • Corporate treasury
    • Credit analysis
    • Equity research
    • Risk management

    What are the basic financial reports that a nonprofit must prepare? #motor #finance #corporation


    #basic finance

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    Home 2-Minute FAQ Finance What are the basic financial reports that a nonprofit must prepare?

    What are the basic financial reports that a nonprofit must prepare?

    The basic financial reports of a nonprofit organization include:

    • Statement of financial position (also called a balance sheet): This summarizes the assets, liabilities and net assets of the organization at a specified date. It’s a snapshot of the organization’s financial position on that date.
    • Statement of activity (also called an income and expense statement): This reports the organization’s financial activity over a period of time. It shows income minus expenses, which results in either a profit or a loss.
    • Statement of cash flow: This summarizes the resources that become available to the organization during the reporting period and the uses made of such resources. It’s especially useful in real-time because it reports income that has been received and expenses that have been paid. A statement of projected cash flow is helpful for the board and organization to be able to anticipate any shortfalls for planning purposes.
    • Statement of functional expenses: Reports all expenses as related either to program services or to supporting services. Expenses under program services are shown divided among the various programs. Expenses under supporting services are generally divided between (1) management and general expenses and (2) fundraising expenses.

    While these reports are extremely important in terms of understanding your organization’s financial health and conveying that information to your board, you’ll also find that these types of reports will often be required by funders when applying for grants.

    Other reports, depending on your organization’s needs, are: government information returns, payroll tax returns, reports to funders, management reports, budget monitoring reports, and analysis of statements and investment reports.

    A detailed list of financial reports for nonprofits, and related definitions can be found in Financial Statements of Not-for-Profit Organizations, by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (www.fasb.org ).

    There are also a few accounting basics you should keep in mind. A qualified bookkeeper can help you to ensure reports are prepared properly and in a timely manner. He or she can also help to reconcile bank statements on a monthly basis, which is critical, and lend support and key information during budget development.

    Finance FAQ


    What Do You Want to Learn? #agricultural #finance


    #personal finance

    #

    What Do You Want to Learn?

    These lessons teach the basics of personal finance, what it is, our perspective, why it is important, and how we can be better stewards over our resources.

    These lessons are a bit more advanced and detailed. We use the MoneyWise workshops and other intermediate lessons to help you understand financial principles as you learn to live within your means, get out of debt, and save for long-term goals.

    These lessons are for those who already have a good background in personal finance, They include courses for older college students, young married/single adults, returned missionaries, and freshman college students. We also include courses on retirement planning and advanced investing. These lessons cover all areas of personal finance, in great detail from perspectives, to budgets, to investments and retirement planning.


    What You Need To Know About Zero-Percent Car Loans #truck #finance


    #0 finance car

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    What You Need To Know About Zero-Percent Car Loans

    Zero-percent loans are often advertised as one of the best deals you can get when you’re buying a new car. You’ll sometimes hear people call such financing “free money.” It’s not that exactly, but it’s as close as you’re likely to get. Zero-percent loans tend to grab attention, but they make up only about 9 percent of the dealer-financed car loans in 2015 to date, according to Edmunds data.

    Provided you can qualify for a zero-percent car loan, it sounds like a no-brainer. But is it really a good deal? Are there any catches? And if you were planning on paying cash, is it even worth considering?

    How Can It Be Zero Percent?
    Zero-percent loans are typically offered by automakers’ financing companies. They forgo the money they would have made on loans with interest in favor of selling more of a particular vehicle. This financing incentive can spark sales of a slow-selling vehicle or help clear out inventory to make room for cars from the new model year.

    “The availability of zero-percent deals follow a pretty rigid pattern,” says Jeremy Acevedo, senior analyst for Edmunds.com. Zero-percent offers peak in the summer months to stimulate sales for the outgoing model year and stay “relatively subdued” in the other months, he says.

    Carmakers advertise the no-interest loans in commercials, at dealerships or on their websites. We suggest taking a look at Edmunds’ Incentives and Rebates page. It highlights zero-percent financing offers and other promotions for the month.

    Sometimes a dealership will offer its own version of zero-percent financing. In this case, the dealership opts to pay the interest on your loan, either to sweeten a deal or as an incentive for you to make a large down payment. It typically occurs when a buyer already qualifies for a loan with a low annual percentage rate (APR) and the amount being financed is a figure the dealer deems reasonable.

    How To Qualify
    Zero-percent loans are typically reserved for buyers with excellent credit. The fine print on automaker websites often says things like “for qualified buyers” or “based on Tier One credit.” The language doesn’t really spell out what that means in terms of FICO scores. And the range itself can vary from one automaker to another, so we suggest calling the dealership to see what the requirements are.

    Just what is “Tier One” credit, for example? It’s a FICO of 690-719, according to one Washington state Toyota dealership that posted its credit tiers online. But that’s just one brand and one dealership’s numbers. According to credit services company Experian. 752 is the average credit score associated with loans that have an APR of less than 1 percent. As a general rule however, if your FICO score is above 700, you should be able to get a zero-percent loan.

    If your score is slightly lower, zero-percent offers are still worth looking into. There have been cases of people getting approved because of a solid history of making payments on time and loyalty to a car brand despite having a lower credit score.

    Bonus Cash or Zero-Percent Loan?
    There are times when the automaker gives consumers a choice between bonus cash or a loan with a very low interest rate. The bonus cash would usually be the way to go, but when it comes to zero-percent loans, the cash would have to be sufficient to offset the finance charges the buyer is saving.

    For example, let’s say you were buying a $25,000 car with a $1,000 down payment and you’ve qualified for a loan with an interest rate of 3.5 percent. You then have a choice: a bonus cash incentive or a zero-percent loan with no additional discount. It would take an incentive of about $2,500 to beat the zero-percent loan offer. Any amount of bonus cash less than $2,500 makes the zero-percent loan the better option. Use this calculator to input your own scenarios and see what option works best for you.

    There’s also a third option to consider. Increasingly, consumers are taking the bonus cash and then refinancing the interest-bearing loan at a lower rate later, says Melinda Zabritski, senior director of automotive finance for Experian.

    What’s in It for a Cash Buyer?
    If you planned on buying a car for cash, there might still be some value in taking out a zero-percent loan. The biggest benefit is that it allows you to keep your money free for other purposes, such as an emergency fund or for investment. There is no penalty for paying off the loan early. Having financed a car appears as a positive mark on your credit report. Buying for cash doesn’t show up at all.

    In some cases, the dealerships may be getting an incentive from the automaker to promote a zero-percent loan, so taking the dealer’s financing may help you obtain a better price on the vehicle. The automaker typically pays the dealership a bonus on the back end of the deal, which in turn would allow it to be more flexible with the price. It isn’t a common occurrence, but something you should be aware of in case it comes up.

    Zero Percent Do’s
    Do make sure you really want the car. Just because a car has a zero-percent loan offer doesn’t mean it is the right car for you. Make sure you test-drive it to be sure it fits your needs.

    Do get pre-approved for a car loan. It is still a good idea to secure financing with your bank or credit union before you go car shopping. This pre-approval can serve as a backup loan in case you don’t qualify for a zero-percent offer. It’s also useful to have a loan in hand so you can compare its interest rate to the dealership’s financing. You might decide your bank loan, and the dealership’s bonus cash offer makes the most sense for you.

    Zero Percent Don’ts
    Don’t skimp on thedown payment . Some dealers may give you the option to put nothing down at signing. We recommend you put down as close as you can get to 20 percent. If you can’t manage that, consider getting GAP insurance to offset depreciation.

    Don’t take out a loan for more than 60 months. Some automakers offer a 72-month loan to help make the payments lower, but there are many drawbacks to taking out a longer loan. The car’s value will have greatly diminished by the time you finish paying for it. And there’s a good chance you’ll be tired of your 6-year-old car just about the time you make your last payment. A long loan may keep you from owning, free and clear, a car you still love to drive.